GuidesMagazineToolsFossilsHunts
Register Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
gill massey

Neogene Newbie
Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 
WIN_20180808_15_01_09_Pro.jpg 
0
MicroFossilMan

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 620
Reply with quote  #2 
I don't think so, though I'm not sure what they are. Where did you find them? How hard is the stone?
__________________
MFM
0
prep01

Avatar / Picture

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 2,553
Reply with quote  #3 
Hello Gill and welcome to the forum. Firstly, could you always let us know the location where they were found and add a scale to all photos (a ruler is best) and don't be mean with your photos - all aspects should be taken.
Having said that, sea molluscs which graze on microscopic algae etc on rocks and 'rasp' a feeding trail which is what you have here (modern) are worldwide. The small piece to the bottom right might be a small piece of a fossil bivalve.

__________________
Colin Huller
0
gill massey

Neogene Newbie
Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #4 
The stone which looks like it has a worm trail on it is in a hard stone and the small piece which looks like a leaf pattern is in a very thin silver of rock. I will take more photos in future and try to put them to scale. Sorry am new to this so a bit clueless. I found them at saltwick bay. Thanks for your help
0
estwing

Avatar / Picture

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 169
Reply with quote  #5 
They don'l look like fossil to me, probably modern mollusc feeding trails, but they are beautiful and intriguing...
0
prep01

Avatar / Picture

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 2,553
Reply with quote  #6 
Estwing - I did say the trails are modern.
__________________
Colin Huller
0
TqB

Avatar / Picture

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 2,473
Reply with quote  #7 
They're worn, longitudinal sections of modern rock boring worm burrows, Polydora ciliata or similar.

Here are some fresher ones on a large belemnite:

IMG_2792.jpg 


__________________
Tarquin
0
MicroFossilMan

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 620
Reply with quote  #8 
Is it purely a mechanical thing or do the little beggars secret "acid" or whatever? And what do they gain from it? Lime?
__________________
MFM
0
TqB

Avatar / Picture

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 2,473
Reply with quote  #9 
Possibly both - "It has been suggested that burrowing is achieved by mechanical action of the chaetae, especially those of the 5th segment, but this is open to some doubt as chemical action may also be involved".

I guess they get a good, solid home. [smile]

__________________
Tarquin
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.



Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2018 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us