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Chalkers

Cambrian Rockhound
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Posts: 43
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi all,

I visited the coastline around Beer a couple of weeks ago for a spot of fossil hunting and camping; I was disappointed with Hooken Cliff (came away with very little), but the coastline between Beer and Seaton was very productive. I was interested to be finding fossils from within the marginal facies chalk as opposed to the Southern or Northern province locations that I've encountered before.

Most of my finds were around 10mm in size and chiselled out of the weathered boulders from slumped cliffs. I don't really have the means to prep these fossils fully but most of them have weathered in a way that highlights the detail within the exposed surfaces very well anyway.

I'd be extremely grateful if anyone could help me identify the species of echinoids below:

A20180512_114323.jpg20180512_114405.jpgB2 20180512_114435.jpg 

C20180512_114853.jpgC2 20180512_114932.jpg D20180512_115100.jpg 

E20180512_115322.jpgE2  20180512_115238.jpg 
F) - Also found this lovely Camerogalerus minimus...20180512_115417.jpg 

I couldn't decide whether C is Galerites or Conulus subrotunus. Likewise I thought perhaps E might be Peroniaster sp? (or is it Periaster?).

Any help would be greatly appreciated! Cheers!

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prep01

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Cambrian Rockhound
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Reply with quote  #2 
Hello Charlie. without seeing them fully preppedand sooooooooooo small etc it's very hard to distinguish to even a genus! I use the PalAss book - as I think you do, but there isn't enough detail on these without prepping - sorry! I could help you but not sure about 'advertising' nowadays on here.
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Colin Huller
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Chalkers

Cambrian Rockhound
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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for the response Colin, I thought that might be the case and armed with only a penknife and a toothbrush I daren't risk damaging the fossils any further by attempting to prep them. I do have the Pal. Ass. book (which is excellent even if it's not completely comprehensive and there's already a little bit of out-of-date terminology such as 'lower, middle and upper chalk'). I've previously looked into purchasing some of the Palaeontographical Society Monographs that provide a complete record of all cretaceous British echinoids but some of them are hellishly expensive (and I have to admit a lot of the terminology goes right over my head!). Cheers!
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andy333

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hi Chalkers, C and C2 are Conulus subrotundus, which are common in the lower turonian of east Devon. I think you should check out Tetragramma variolare for B and B2 as a possibility. Can't help with the other id's. 
I still prefer the old terminology- 'lower, middle and upper chalk'. 
A good long soak then repeated cycles of soaking and drying along with a bit of work with a scalpel will bring out more detail. It takes quite a while but the results can be good.

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andy333
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Chalkers

Cambrian Rockhound
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Posts: 43
Reply with quote  #5 
Hi Andy and thanks. I looked up T. variolare and while it does look superficially very similar I think there are fewer tubercles on my fossil (I know the quality of the photograph isn't fantastic). With a bit more research I had in mind that it might be Polydiadema bonei (which according to Robert Randell's excellent website) is "common in the sandy facies of the SW".

I've been soaking my finds in the cistern of my toilet and will probably leave them there for a month (maybe longer for the larger finds) before I take them out properly. I've sadly had some lovely finds in the past that have succumbed to the damage of salt! - never again! 
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mike rasta

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hi Chalkers,

A) is Protocardiaster truncatus which is common in the Holywell nodular chalk of the area. Finding a good example is very tricky as the test is so thin and prone to damage.

Your Peroniaster ID is quite likely.

The Conulus are subrotundus which is widespread in the Holywell chalk.

I will try and look up the others at some stage.

Welcome to the world of small blob like echinoids from the Cenomanian and lower Turonian!


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mike rasta

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hi Chalkers,

A) is Protocardiaster truncatus which is common in the Holywell nodular chalk of the area. Finding a good example is very tricky as the test is so thin and prone to damage.

Your Peroniaster ID is quite likely.

The Conulus are subrotundus which is widespread in the Holywell chalk.

I will try and look up the others at some stage.

Welcome to the world of small blob like echinoids from the Cenomanian and lower Turonian!
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Chalkers

Cambrian Rockhound
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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks Mike that's helpful info!
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