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mr ammonites

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Triassic Titan
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Reply with quote  #1 
I have come across some nice Belemnites in the Cotswold waterpark area, the large ones I believe are Cylindoteuthis pusoziana, the smallest one Belemnopsis bessina? But I may be wrong do you know better?

bel1.jpg 
bel2.jpg 

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prep01

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi Mark - top to bottom
1) Yup - Bellenopsis bessina
2) Hibolites /hustata
the rest Cylindroteuthis puzosiana I'm pretty certain

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Colin Huller
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TqB

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Reply with quote  #3 
I agree with Colin apart from no. 2 - I'm pretty sure it's a juvenile Cylindroteuthis. It should have a furrow at the apical end. Hibolites has one in the alveolar region that dies out towards the apex.  
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TOARCIANJOHN

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hi, Following the exchange of posts, I sent the photo's to an expert I know specialising in belemnites.
Prof. Peter Doyle, who wrote 'All are Cylindroteuthis pusoziana including the small versions,apart from
the clavate one with the long groove. This is Hibolithes hastatus.'
Hope this info. I helpful.
Greetings, TOARCIANJOHN

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mr ammonites

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Reply with quote  #5 
Thank you very much TOARCIANJOHN!
I have another Belemnite found in the Illminster area and am wanting to identify it but not having too much luck.
There is a monograph on Belemnites that I need to invest in I think.

DSC_0380.jpg 

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brym

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Reply with quote  #6 
Possibly antemortem bitten Cylindroteuthis.
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Reply with quote  #7 
That's an interesting belemnite.
One or two more views are necessary - is it compressed much and does it have any furrows at the apex?

If no furrows and not particularly compressed it could be a Gastrobelus. That would be Pliensbachian.

If there's a single groove (which is ventral) and marked compression, it could be a Dactyloteuthis, maybe D. digitalis although it's a bit narrow at the front (blunt) end.
That would be Upper Toarcian and particularly interesting as it's confined to the south in the UK and is possibly a Tethyan species. 
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TOARCIANJOHN

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Reply with quote  #8 
Further to Tarquins comments, belemnites are not my interest but I believe he is on the right track. Most belemnites from the Somerset Toarcian are Upper Toarcian. Your specimen suggests Dactyloteuthis digitalis (Blainville) but also Mesoteuthis cf. rhenanus, but it is the poor preservation that makes it difficult to be certain.
Greetings,  TOARCIANJOHN

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PALAEOJACK
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Reply with quote  #9 
Hi Palaeojack, thanks for the stratigraphical information - I don't think it's Mesoteuthis ( or Megateuthis) rhenana as they're not clavate to that extent.

Dactyloteuthis digitalis is my guess at the moment but I'd still like another view at 90 degrees to that one and some furrow information.
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mr ammonites

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Reply with quote  #10 
I'll post some othe views later tonight. Thank you for your comments. M
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mr ammonites

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Reply with quote  #11 
DSC_0437.jpg  DSC_0436.jpg  DSC_0435.jpg  DSC_0434.jpg  DSC_0433.jpg  DSC_0432.jpg  DSC_0438.JPG 
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Reply with quote  #12 
Thanks for the photos. Well, it's compressed a bit but apparently not as much as is typical for Dactyloteuthis digitalis. I wouldn't rule it out though.

I can't see an apical furrow which D. digitalis should have (what do you think? - try rotating it with a strong light to show up any slight groove). So, just on morphology, it looks most like a Gastrobelus. Do you get any Pliensbachian material around there?

It has an apical umbilicus but both these genera can show one.

(Like a lot of ammonites, you really need a horizon to ID belemnites reliably - and preferably a population so one or two more would help.[smile]
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TOARCIANJOHN

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Reply with quote  #13 
Yes, the Upper Pliensbachian Marlstone is a common feature of the brash around Ilminster in south Somerset. As you say, Tarquin, without stratigraphy we're shooting in the dark, particularly with poorly preserved material. Sorry, Mr. ammonites.
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PALAEOJACK
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Reply with quote  #14 
Thanks, Palaeojack. Actually, I don't think it's badly preserved, just encrusted a bit. At least we can say a lot of things it isn't!
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