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lillyfay

Neogene Newbie
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Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #1 
I wondered if you lovely people could help me with some Id please. I found a huge chunk of ammonite in the bottom of the boulder clay near Ulrome. I think it might be Coroniceras? It's very heavy (pictures don't do it justice). I also found a lovely specimen of what I think is Dactylioceras (as it has no spine) at Barmston drain that I wanted to share. It just sat there in the water so presume it got washed in. Nature shaped a perfect ornament - just needs a little tlc 😊

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Elbert

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Cambrian Rockhound
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Reply with quote  #2 
Hello, the big chunk is definitly from an Arietid; Coroniceras is well possible.
Your Dac. is not the common one; it resembles Orthodactylites, so probably a Grey Shale or Jetrock ammonite.
Nice finds!

greetings, Bert

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lillyfay

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you very much Bert! :-) And super interesting about the Orthodactylites! Will digg some more info out on that.
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brym

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Cambrian Rockhound
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Reply with quote  #4 
Have you found any other fossils at Barmston Drain? it's not a place I would have thought of looking.

Brian
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lillyfay

Neogene Newbie
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Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #5 
Plenty Gryphaea but of course you can find them pretty much anywhere along this beach. And there are long stretches of Boulder Clay on the cliff edge so always find the odd bit of Ammo and Coral in the sift bands. Though rarely so well preserved and in one piece.

Having said that, I really do think this particular Ammo was washed in as it just sat in a little rock pool, upside down, next to a larger rock. I hadn't expected to find something like this right by the drain. There are fields of clay along the waterline as well so I always have a look around the rock pools at the break line just after the tide has gone out to see what has been left behind or washed out of the clay.

The Holderness Coast really is an amazing place for fossil hunting :-) We never come back empty handed.
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