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Curiousexplorer

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Reply with quote  #1 
I have had this ‘fossil’ for probably around 15 years now and the details will be fairly poor I am afraid. It turned up in a pile of chalk rocks being used to build a retaining wall, I came across it and decided to keep it instead of it being lost in said wall. It is approximately 8.5” x 5” x 4.5”. I believe it is actually fullers earth and not chalk but could be wrong. I always thought it was an ammonite but recent research suggests that they never grew this big. Any help would be amazing. There is definite rib marks running at an angle across the top, hard to pick out in photos. If it was an ammonite then it would have been a few feet in diameter and that can’t be right. It is not a natural formation I’m sure, but as to what it could be is baffling

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estwing

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Reply with quote  #2 
Looks like an ammonite segment - btw, ammonites can get as big as 6-7 feet across.
Doesn't look like chalk, though
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Brittle Star

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi and welcome.
Not a lot to go on, especially as original location unknown. Ammonites got huge, look up the ones found on Portland, bigger than a car tyre. If the ribbing radiates out from a keel it may be a fragment of an ammonites or it could be part of a bivalve.
Some one else may be able to comment further.

Sorry Estwing must have been writing my reply as you posted.

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Curiousexplorer

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Reply with quote  #4 
Outstanding, I didn’t realise they grew that big. I’m still very much an amateur but learning. You’re right, it doesn’t look like chalk perhaps it is fullers earth. I would imagine it would have been local stuff, and I’m based in Surrey.

On a side note, I’ve just come back from camping down in Dorset and managed to collect a couple of interesting finds. I’ll get some photos up of these. I believe one is a bivalve with some lovely ridging marks. One I think is a mollusc of some description. Some crystal deposit which I am leaning towards quarts and a large sausage looking iron lump, perhaps a wood deposit or maybe a belemite. Would be interesting to see what you guys and girls think.

Either way I throughly enjoyed wandering about and digging through the landslide
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Curiousexplorer

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Reply with quote  #5 
Here are the other finds as promised:

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MicroFossilMan

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Reply with quote  #6 
The first two look like bivalves to me, perhaps Inoceramus and a Pecten of some sort? Somebody will know!

Not sure about your quartz - can you scratch a piece of glass with it? Does it fizz with dilute acid (if you happen to have some!).

Then you have a bit of an ammonite. And finally an iron-rich concretion of some sort - I don't think it's a belemnite.

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Curiousexplorer

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Reply with quote  #7 
The first two have lovely definition to them, happy I managed to get them off without a hammer! It would be interesting to find out more about these, I’m still in taking the huge amount of information out there.

As for the crystal stuff, i’ll do some tests and report back. It was only from memory what this looked like and I’ve just got them back so I can really nose about.

The iron deposit is interesting, there were plenty of iron circle deposits around that had been exposed to air and pretty much disintegrated on sight, the clean end you see what what was exposed before I managed to remove the whole lump, the fact this end isn’t corroded is either from a fresh rock fall or a rich content of iron, from my basic memory of geology
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Richard

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hi

1 and 2 Inoceramus or similar bivalve
3 Another bivalve possibly Spondylus 
4 and 5 ? 
6 and 7 ammonite fragment 
8,9,10,11 not sure but possibly an animal burrow (trace fossil)

All from the chalk? 



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Richard
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prep01

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Reply with quote  #9 
Hello Curious explorer. Given that there is a severe lack of information, I agree with Richard.
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Curiousexplorer

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Reply with quote  #10 
Ok, sorry. These were all found on the Dorset coast, on worbarrow beach. There has been a relatively new landslide that had exposed lots of fresh rock, I don’t know enough about the type of rock but it wasn’t chalk or sandstone. Far too hard for that
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Richard

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hi - it certainly looks like chalk and some of the fossils are typical of the chalk 
The Portsdown Chalk Formation is above Worborrow Bay.
Chalk can be very hard e.g. the Chalk Rock.


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Richard
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MicroFossilMan

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Reply with quote  #12 
Ane the chalk from Yorkshire is a lot harder than the chalk from southern England. Not sure about the Lincolnshire chalk 😉
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efossil

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Reply with quote  #13 
They do get big. I found this at Redcar, North Yorkshire. Not enormous, but impressive.

Keep digging!

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