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Fly_Trap

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Reply with quote  #1 
I visited Lavernock recently, hoping to find bone, and I came across this. I originally thought it might be a pice of bone (possibly from a limb) but am now thinking it's petrified wood. Can someone give me their opinion?

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Brittle Star

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Triassic Titan
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Reply with quote  #2 
Hello

Going by the outside to me it is wood, a honeycomb internal structure would point to a bone.

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Chalkers

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hmm, I think it looks more bone-like myself although it's hard to tell based on the photos and I've never collected from there before. It's doesn't appear to be pyritised or carbonised like you'd expect from wood (although wood can be preserved in many different ways). Assuming the last photo is a break in the 'bone'; to my eyes it does look like it has that honeycomb structure that you'd expect to see in a bone fossil. Some of the bone fossil fragments that I've found have a much more obvious internal structure than others; I've found some bone fossil fragments from Aust that don't look massively different to yours. I'm certainly no expert on fossil bones though!
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Fly_Trap

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Reply with quote  #4 
I would say that it is pyritised as on the third picture it is partially encrusted (the lumpy bits).
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plagistoma

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Reply with quote  #5 
Not quite sure but it could be a bit of rib from the Rhaetic.

steve

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prep01

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Reply with quote  #6 
I've tried to get a better view of the cross-section, but not very successful. could we have a slightly closer photo, taken in natural, overcast light with a scale (a ruler is best). Some other questions - was it beach found or removed from a nodule and what was the matrix (mudstone, shale....)?
At the moment I would say it's a cast of something but I may be wrong.

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Colin Huller
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Fly_Trap

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Reply with quote  #7 
Unfortunately I won't be able to take any more photos of it for at least a week as I am on holiday. I found it amongst small rocks as it is on the beach so I don't know what matrix it originated from but if it helps I found it right on the corner of Lavernock.
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Fly_Trap

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Reply with quote  #8 
I just found some other pictures I had taken of it previously. I hope they help!

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prep01

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Reply with quote  #9 
I will wait for another photo of the cross section  - thanks
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Colin Huller
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Bow1980

Triassic Titan
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Reply with quote  #10 
Steve is spot on, definitely bone from the Westbury beds.
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Fly_Trap

Neogene Newbie
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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bow1980
Steve is spot on, definitely bone from the Westbury beds.

Excellent! So it would be from the Triassic. Any suggestions at what animal it could be from?
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