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Scrumpy

Cretaceous Climber
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Reply with quote  #1 
Hi everyone,
I know it might be a bit of a long shot, but could anyone id this ammonite for me please

Thanks in advance
Rob

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Elbert

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Cambrian Rockhound
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Reply with quote  #2 
Hello, no ammonite; it`s a nautilus.
You can see this in the chamberwalls; no complicated sutures, but a curved line.
Nautilii are far rarer than ammonites in Yorkshire, so a good find!

greetings, Bert

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prep01

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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi Rob, I agree with Elbert - nice find - prepped and polished these look awesome!
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Scrumpy

Cretaceous Climber
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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks for the reply's Bert & Prep01.
And there I was thinking it was just a bit of bashed up ammonite😀.
Prep01, you mentioned prepped and polished...
Do koi think there is enough left to work on and how do you polish them?

Regards Rob
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Scrumpy

Cretaceous Climber
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Reply with quote  #5 
Hi all just two more question,
How old are nautilus ?
Why are they more rare than ammonites?

Thanks in advance
Rob
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Elbert

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Reply with quote  #6 
Hello, the age depends on the layer where it came from; this rock does not really look very familiar to me, Ironstone?
If I had to guess I would say: probably Pliensbachian in age; ca. 200 million years old.
Nautilii are more rare because on average you`ll find 1000 ammonites for 1 nautilus, in Yorkshire that is.
I once visited a quarry in Normandy, long ago, where it was the opposite...
Hope this answers your questions,

greetings, Bert

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TOARCIANJOHN

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Reply with quote  #7 
Hi Rob, As you have an interest in nautiloids, here's more info. The nautiloids and ammonoids together make up the subclass Tetrabranchiata. Nautilus was around way back in time, as orthoconic in shape, not coiled and was the largest predator for a time. From the CAMBRIAN TO MODERN TIMES, THE NAUTILUS HAS SURVIVED - THE AMMONOIDEA EVOLVED FROM THEM IN THE DEVONIAN.  The specifics are chronologically, clymenias, goniatites, ceratites then finally ammonites. Then there is the big question - if the ammonite evolved from the nautilus, why did the latter survive up to present day eg IMPERIAL, PAPER, lACE, but quantitively dwindled. Consider the abundance of ammonites in the MESOZOIC and in the lower Cretaceous they werethe most abundant invertebrate.   Then they became extinct, yet we have the modern Nautilus.
Wolfgang Grulke has a superb book available on the Nautilii but an answer to the ammonite extinction event I think is still a contentious debate.
Hope this is of interest..Greetings,  TOARCIANJOHN

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