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Stillburning

Neogene Newbie
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Reply with quote  #1 
This is my first post on the forum, I have developed an interest in fossils following some finds on cultivated land when metal detecting (near Coombe Hill, Gloucestershire). Gryphea are relatively common but the first couple of photos below show some of the other pieces I have found.

There are occasional nodules like the one in the third photo, I think they will contain flint, which may contain fossils - but that some are fossils themselves - have I anything to lose by breaking this open?

I went to Tites Point down to low tide this morning but as I was on my own I didnt access the western rocks as the mud was getting too deep. I found some Gryphea on the eastern area but thoroughly enjoyed poking round in such a scenic area.

IMG_3252 (Mobile).jpg  IMG_3256 (Mobile).jpg  IMG_3672 (Mobile).jpg

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Brittle Star

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi and welcome

The bottom photo I have no idea about conception maybe.
Definitely bivalves but these not my speciality, someone may be able to help.

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JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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prep01

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Cambrian Rockhound
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Reply with quote  #3 
Hello and welcome to the forum. Your first photo is what looks like a sandy mudstone with bit of bivalve shells. In the second photo the first 2 photos are of bivalves and the third is a Gryphaea with the second valve attached. The third photo doesn't look like flint, rather a middle Jurassic nodule which miight contain a fossil. I would suggest that should you want to see iif there is anything inside, tap it firmly with a hammer all the way round - it appears to be layered so there might be a weak point going round. If this doesn't work then a heavier 'whack' along the 'beddding planes' (layers). No guarantees though - good luck withit
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Colin Huller
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Stillburning

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thank you for your replies.

You were correct, the nodule was not a flint (I have a lot to learn!) and proved very resistant to cracking open, in the end it revealed a core of a much paler stone but no fossil.
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prep01

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Reply with quote  #5 
sorry abou!t that. Stats from \\\\\as I remember iit) from Jurassic coast -
20 % of nodules will contain a fossil
of that 20% 2% will be good enough to prep.!

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Colin Huller
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