GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
gwfinds
SNV30017.jpg  SNV30018.jpg  SNV30019.jpg  SNV30020.jpg  SNV30021.jpg  SNV30022.jpg  SNV30023.jpg  SNV30024.jpg  SNV30025.jpg ammonite found at shipston on stour ,any ideas what kind ?
Quote 0 0
Barrow Museum
Shipston on Stour has a history of fine ammonite finds from the Lias Group, which forms the lower part Jurassic strata in the UK.  This one is an Arietitid ammonite, dating to the Sinemurian Stage of the Lower Jurassic and looks to me like Arietites bucklandi, which has given its name to the lowest Zone of this Stage (the Bucklandi Zone).  It looks like it will repair quite well.  The part in which the ammonite creature actually lived (the body chamber) is missing, and you have the "septate" central part, divided up into chambers by "septae" which were partially filled with air to provide buoyancy for the shell.  The ammonite could vary the air/liquid mix to adjust its depth in the water column.  But note before it is all stuck together that you have what is called geopetal structure - the partially sediment-infilled final chamber indicates where some mud could enter the shell and settled on its lower side, indicating the way-up of the ammonite when it died and was buried in sediment.  The crystals will be calcite and grew during the fossilisation process in the voids.
Quote 0 0
gwfinds
hi many thanks for the reply ,really interesting
i do have more finds from shipston that i have no idea about but look unusual ,i will upload some pics ,thanks
Quote 0 0
estwing
Could it be Euagassiceras? It has spines on the ribs near the ventral area
Quote 0 0
gwfinds
heres some more finds from same location  SNV30026.jpg  SNV30027.jpg  SNV30028.jpg  SNV30029.jpg  SNV30030.jpg  SNV30031.jpg  SNV30032.jpg  SNV30033.jpg  SNV30034.jpg  SNV30035.jpg  SNV30036.jpg   
Quote 0 0
Barrow Museum
As Estwing suggests, the first one could be Euagassiceras, I agree, (my first reply was hurried, late at night) - but I am not used to seeing them that big!  If it is, most of the same comments apply, except that it would be a tad younger, coming from the Semicostatum Zone of the Sinemurian Stage.  The earlier Arietitid ammonites like Arietites and Coroniceras can have low profile tubercules or bullae developing on the ventral shoulder, for which you can see traces in the large ammonite fragments in the subsequent photo-set.  Distinguishing between them all is never easy.

Also in your second set is a nautiloid shell, lots of mudstone nodules and a septarian concretion, as well as a number of what look like pyritic nodules which have rotted in the subsoil and partially converted to a mineral (maybe selenite - a form of gypsum?)
Quote 0 0
gwfinds
hi ,thank you for your reply very interesting .
the pyritic nodules are all hollow and are filled with clay ,here are some more pics
also the mudstone nodules / clay when you brake some they are like septarian with crystals photod with ammonites and devils toenails and shells on the outside  SNV30037.jpg  SNV30038.jpg  SNV30039.jpg  SNV30040.jpg  SNV30041.jpg  SNV30042.jpg  SNV30043.jpg  SNV30044.jpg  SNV30045.jpg  SNV30046.jpg   
Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us