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pauledevans
[UPDATE: more photos added in thread]

I’ve used this site for reference for years, but this is the first time I’ve shared.

I spent this afternoon climbing the scree slope above the ‘fossil trench’, found a stack of the usual brachiopods etc.. Having been there a couple of times before, but always with family, I haven't had the opportunity really focus in on what I was looking at, so this time, I found - I believe - 4 trilobite fragments, the one on the right was the first and cleanest…C2966B22-408A-4EB7-B61B-12B3DC7FA2C7.jpeg 
…but I’m posting about the one on the left. The nobly structure I believe is part of a head plate. Can anyone confirm?
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Dirty Pete
I used to go there when I was a kid in the 70's, I'm pretty sure I can see an occipital ring so it's a cephalon.  I think the kobbly headed ones were either Ecrinurus punctatus or Balizoma variolaris.

Pete
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pauledevans
Thanks, Pete. Looking at reference online, Balizoma looks like a pretty good match 👍
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prep01
Welcome to the forum Paul, nce blocks, but for me it's the other bits in the rock I am interested in! The 'lattice' structure on the lower right is a Fennestrellid bryozoan and looks to be a big piece, but you have not included a scale (a ruler is best) in all photos.
Colin Huller
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pauledevans
prep01 wrote:
Welcome to the forum Paul, nce blocks, but for me it's the other bits in the rock I am interested in! The 'lattice' structure on the lower right is a Fennestrellid bryozoan and looks to be a big piece, but you have not included a scale (a ruler is best) in all photos.


Based on this prompt, I've captured a cross section of my finds. This is perhaps a 6th of the material I brought home, but if I'd collected every fossil I saw, I'd need a dumper-truck. I've included a rule (cm), and I've numbered them in the event that's helpful…

IMG_5048 copy.jpg  IMG_5049 copy.jpg  IMG_5050 copy.jpg  IMG_5051 copy.jpg  IMG_5052 copy.jpg  IMG_5053 copy.jpg  IMG_5054.jpg  IMG_5055 copy.jpg
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Gerald Gibson
Pauledevens:

Your selection is very similar to those fossils in my collection of New Mexico Pennsylvanian marine fossils.  There is, in fact, a counterpart in all of your samples, including the trilobite pygidium I found in New Mexico.  What is the geological age?  You have quite a selection of brachiopod, trilobite, crinoid, and bryozoan fossils.  I'm not sure what #1 is in the photo (it could be the cephalon of a trilobite), but #2 is the thorax/pygidium of a trilobite.  #4, though in bad shape, is similar to #2.  I believe #5 and #14 are bryozoans, and # 10,16, and 17 are brachiopods.  #7 are arboreal cups of crinoids, and #12 and #13 are crinoid stalks.  I don't know what 11 and 18 are.  More magnification might help.  I think the area where you found these must be an excellent fossil site.  Keep up the good work!

---- Gerald
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pauledevans
Pauledevens:



---- Gerald


Hey, Gerald. Thanks!

They are from a location called Wren’s Nest, Dudley in the UK’s West Midlands. It’s an incredibly dense Silurian site, fossils literally litter the floor in places. Trilobites are what the site’s known for, but they are a tiny fraction of the finds there.
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Gerald Gibson
Pauledevens:

It's very difficult to find a whole trilobite.  I have an excellent example of Phacops from Ohio and specimens of Elrathia from Utah, but most my trilobites (found in Marble Mountains) are just cephalons and one pygidium from New Mexico.  Keep looking Wren's Nest.  You might be lucky and find whole trilobites.  Good luck!

---- Gerald
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