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Daxinomega
Hey all, found this today by chance when leaving the bay, there appears to be another piece sticking on the flipside of the rock, also the rock looks as though it wishes to break along the line on the flipside, sorry for the poor photos, camera flash... Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_201232.jpg, Views: 44, Size: 135.64 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_201244.jpg, Views: 44, Size: 168.44 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_201309.jpg, Views: 38, Size: 122.00 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_192734.jpg, Views: 38, Size: 178.55 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_201326.jpg, Views: 42, Size: 134.10 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_201300.jpg, Views: 41, Size: 158.77 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_201304.jpg, Views: 41, Size: 132.18 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_201401.jpg, Views: 49, Size: 146.65 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_201424.jpg, Views: 51, Size: 212.12 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_201211.jpg, Views: 49, Size: 211.96 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_201341.jpg, Views: 37, Size: 117.81 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_201344.jpg, Views: 36, Size: 97.87 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 20200222_201222.jpg, Views: 32, Size: 172.11 KB
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Rhaetianpenarth207
Nice find! I think the piece on the side may be part of a bivalve but I’m not completely sure. Sorry to be that guy, but it’s spelt ‘ammonite’ and not ‘annamite’ 😉 
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Daxinomega
Lol no worries, I hit send before correcting the auto correct.  Don't worry about being that guy, I won't take it to heart as I know I've spelt it correctly in other posts here haha.

I feel like the rock needs to be split carefully.  Maybe a job for tomorrow. 
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Rhaetianpenarth207
If you’re worried about it breaking then you could take it to a professional to be cleaned. However, I reckon that’s not really necessary and a good strike with a hammer will do the trick. However, you could coat it in the exposed ammonite in something like Paraloid B72 to stabilise it. I only just recently acquired some and I think it would have been useful in a few past scenarios. I was once hitting a rock nearby an ichthyosaur tooth I’d just extracted and the shockwaves through the ground blew it to pieces and not even direct contact 🤣.
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Daxinomega
As the rock is really soft I do want to protect it also bring out the detail somehow... I don't prep much only to dig things out so any advice on that would be awesome.
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Rhaetianpenarth207
If you want to reveal features then you could use dental tools etc. or if you prepare fossils a lot, then you could consider buying something such as an air scribe. These are very expensive and you also need a compressor etc. Some people also use electric tools but they aren’t very accurate in my opinion. I don’t own an air scribe but if you search preparing an ammonite, then you will get an idea about what an air scribe can do. I was recommended an ARO as a starter or many people use a Chicago pneumatic. I’m not sure how soft the rock is but you could try a hard brush or a wash in water after doing most the prep might just do the trick. Many people can do wonders just using a hammer and chisel. Some other members may also give advice on how to prep chalk as I’m not really familiar with it.
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snowyandtintin
The photo No.8 shows an ammonite (possibly Mantelliceras sp.) from the Chalk, usually found on the White Nothe headland at Ringstead Bay. It's pretty eroded and certainly not worth money to have it prepped professionally. The cost of the prepping would far outweigh the worth of the piece, which won't turn out as you might hope! The matrix is soft and a steel pin (not a chisel- far too coarse!) , a small hammer and some care could reveal a bit more of it. Prepping something like this is good practice, in any case. If you're that concerned, I'd keep it until you find another, as they do crop up with frequency at the far end of the bay and in the fallen Chalk blocks on the beach. - Steve
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snowyandtintin
In terms of protection, a simple 1:3 PVA to water solution will do the trick. Paraloid B-72 dissolved in acetone is the ideal but messy and probably unnecessary on this particular specimen.
 Good luck!
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