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kwicher

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Reply with quote  #1 
foss1.png  foss4.png  foss3.png  foss2.png Hello
Above are photos of the find from Hunstanton from today's low tide.
Any idea what is this?

Thanks

K

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prep01

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Cambrian Rockhound
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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi, this is part of the outer whorl of an ammonite from the chalk, possibly Mammaites nodosodes. I have not seen one from this country - nice find.
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Colin Huller
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Reply with quote  #3 
Hi

I used to live in Hunstanton  and have many specimens like these.

They are from the Lower Carstone, equivalent of the Lower Greensand. The beds are very very rarely exposed and only ever on an extremely low tide. But Fragments like yours can be collected from amongs`t the  Carstone "boulders" that occur on the foreshore. The Ammonites are usually specimens of Deshayesites sp. I have included a picture of similar specimens from the locality.Carstone Ammonites.jpg Thanks.

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prep01

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Reply with quote  #4 
Sorry, 'advantage' I don't agree. I don't see any evidence of tubercles (nodes') on your specimens. You also mention that the Carstone is rarely uncovered so it it unlikely to have eroded enough to produce a large specimen.
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Colin Huller
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The specimen is not from the chalk , chalk specimens from  the chalk from Hunstanton only occur as composite moulds, the original aragonite  shell have been dissolved away.

My photo was Just an example of the specimens that occur from the Aptian beds at the locality. Sorry if I cauesed confusion. Although the beds from which they derive are rarely exposed, fragmentary specimens do occur washed out on the foreshore. I have many in my collection, as I said I lived in Hunstanton, and still live very near. My point was just to say the specimens are not from the chalk. Large Turrilites.jpg . Also most, if not all Ammonite specimens   from Hunstanton are poorly preserved, as the specimen in the photo shows. Turrilites sp, above is a typical example from the chalk beds. Hope this helps.

Thanks

Steve


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