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Julian123


Hi Pete, thanks for the welcome.

Yes that's what I meant, I thought it was calcite - is there a lot of gypsum about?

If not I will find somewhere else where he can collect his 'crystals' or maybe take him to Charmouth for some pyrite.


Edited by Julian123 2016-02-18 06:59:18
Julian

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P King Chef
Bow,

it would appear that my answer to your post was also deleted on the "old" forum.

The photo of the bone appears to be a Pachystropheus rhaeticus femur and at 9cm quite a large individual, a good find having a near complete one as normally they are just fragments.

Link to palass paper (pdf) on said beastie, http://palaeontology.palass-pubs.org/pdf/Vol%2039/Pages%20323-349.pdf. It's worth downloading as a reference and as a good source of id'ing the assortment of bones usually found in the Rhaetic material.

Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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glendac
Hi,Pete,
We were in the process of changing servers and as mentioned a few posts miight have got lost during the process. Thats a very handy link. Thankyou.

 

Regards Glenda

UK FOSSILS
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P King Chef



My post from 30th July.

"Down towards the bridge, just before the large tree trunk there is a
section of Blue Anchor formation that has fallen and it looks like a
lot more is due to fall soon. But the best bit is sticking out just
above this, what looks like a three foot section of bone bed just
hanging on by its fingernails".


More or less just got back from having a quick (hopeful) look at the above mentioned section. It has finally fallen but  some one else beat me to it .

It also appears that quite alot of bone bed has fallen since my last visit as I was picking up smashed up pieces and large clasts all along the beach.

This is the section of cliff where I saw the piece hanging out and you can see how much has fallen as this section was level with the rest.

[attach:fileid=uploads/318/Aust_Conditions_004.jpg]

All the blue /grey rock is fresh and is from the Blue Anchor Formation (on top of which is sat the basal bone bed).

[attach:fileid=uploads/318/Aust_Conditions_005.jpg]

The remains of a large piece of bone bed (probably the one I saw). Unfortunately it is nearly all clasts with very little in the way of fossil material.

[attach:fileid=uploads/318/Aust_Conditions_001.jpg]

I did however pick out this small piece of bone.
[attach:fileid=uploads/318/Aust_Conditions_002.jpg]


Ah well there's always next time.


Edited by P King Chef 2009-08-04 21:19:22
Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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Allan
Pete, I hope to see you down at Aust sometime soon. Your eyes are always better than mine,
 

Allan
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P King Chef
Hi Allan,

look forward to it, I'm free weekends and usually able to finish work early on a Friday so PM me when you're heading this way and I can be there within 15 mins.


Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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Bow1980
P King Chef wrote:
Bow,

it would appear that my answer to your post was also deleted on the "old" forum.

The photo of the bone appears to be a Pachystropheus rhaeticus femur and at 9cm quite a large individual, a good find having a near complete one as normally they are just fragments.

Link to palass paper (pdf) on said beastie, http://palaeontology.palass-pubs.org/pdf/Vol%2039/Pages%20323-349.pdf. It's worth downloading as a reference and as a good source of id'ing the assortment of bones usually found in the Rhaetic material.

 

Thanks Pete

 

You probably already have this paper, but incase not...

 

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P King Chef

Thanks Bow,
yes I've got that paper, which incidentally is the full version of what is in "Fossils of the Rhaetian Penarth Group"  book chapter 15. 

Here's a couple more papers that might be of interest to you.

http://palaeontology.palass-pubs.org/pdf/Vol%209/Pages%20135-141.pdf

(more so this one after your "footprint" )
http://palaeontology.palass-pubs.org/pdf/Vol%2030/Pages%20407-428.pdf








Edited by P King Chef 2009-08-10 16:02:34
Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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P King Chef
Hi all,

to save me the time and to avoid clogging up the new forum with old stuff here's the link to the previous Aust thread.
http://www.discussfossils.com/display_topic_threads.asp?ForumID=6&TopicID=693&PagePosition=1

Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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P King Chef

Just  more or less got back from Aust, had a look at the highest tide of the year, 14.1m, took a couple of pics but apologies in advance for the slightly blurry effect (slow shutter speed and strong wind don't mix).

Taken 1 hour before high tide at 2015.




At high tide 2112, you can just make out the water against the cliff, a bi-annual event.



The causeway to the pylon all most under water.



It didn't quite top the causeway but it was still blowing up through the drainage holes.




Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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prep01
Pete, out of curiosity, what are the 3 reddish things in the water, or is it the flash bouncing back giving 'red eye effect' on something?
 

Regards

prep01
Colin Huller
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P King Chef
Reflected light from the "foreign" country across the water.
Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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Simon

P King Chef wrote:
Reflected light from the "foreign" country across the water.


I'm a foreigner in a "foreign" land I had to get a passport to be able to leave, and have to pay to get back home! I also had to learn to drive, it snows here, and riding a sportsbike to work at 4am on snow isn't a smart move!

At least when the ice caps melt I'll be above water, so it does have it's benefits.

Used to live in Brizzle, born there.

Simon

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prep01
I didn't mean to start an international incident - honest!!!!!!!
Colin Huller
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Julian123
P King Chef - if I remember correctly all the fossils are at the top of the cliffs at Aust so I assume the high tide won't be much help to you?
Julian

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plagistoma
THAT BRIDGE IS TO LET THE ENGLISH PAY TO COME AND SEE THE BEST BITS LOL
It's always great to "shoot" your own
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rooniehopperbob
hahaaha
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P King Chef

Not been very productive at Aust for quite a while now so after the recent bout of high winds and heavy rain I went and had a look this morning.
Small bits of bone bed are dropping out of the cliff and there are some larger pieces visible in the cliff waiting to drop.
First find is a large Plesi vert that was picked up as shown just lying on the beach.
 Finds_001.jpg 

Finds_002.jpg 

Finds_003.jpg 

Second one is a Ceratodus tooth plate about 45mm long it's in three pieces but easily repairable.
You can just make out where the tooth plate popped of the rock below the broken section.
Finds_005.jpg 


Last one was found a couple of weekends ago. Small (50p sized) Plesi vert.
Finds_004.jpg 









Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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P King Chef

Plesi. vert from yesterday prepped.

Finds_prepped_001.jpg 

Side view showing rib attachment.
Finds_prepped_002.jpg 


Bottom view showing four(!) foramina
Finds_prepped_003.jpg 

Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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Bill G
Nice specimens Pete.
Cheers, Bill
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plagistoma
Nice bone Pete.
 

steve
It's always great to "shoot" your own
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P King Chef
Cheers guys,
finally found the Plesiosaur paper I've got and it's a caudal vert, from a fair sized beastie at that.

Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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Very nice Pete, how did you go about cleaning it?....it has come up really well.
Alan
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P King Chef
Hi Alan,
scrubbed it with a tooth brush to remove the clay and then 1/2 an hour with the pen followed by a quick dunk in vinegar to remove the calcite "skin". Finished with a coat of paraloid.

Et voila!

Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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rockhopper
Very nice pete, when I was there last..for hours... A guy turned up, he was having a poke around and we got chatting, he goes to Aust every now and again for his lunch break, he was there for 15 minutes, poking around where I had already poked, when he walked past and said goodbye he'd found a piece of bone bed with a lovely assortment of goodies.   I was the for hours!!  I'm so rubbish  lol



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prep01
Rockhopper
don't feel bad about it - wish I had a quid for everytime I have walked past/ trodden on/kicked a fossil and the person behind me had picked them up and said "ooooh, look what you've missed"!!!!!

Colin Huller
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P King Chef


Had a fairly decent day today finds wise.
 I popped out Wednesday afternoon to catch a break in the weather and spotted a decent sized section of bone bed had come down, unfortunately work on it was restricted by the failing light and impending rain storm.

On returning to the spot today most of the rock had been moved around by the tide and some of it was broken up a bit more.

nv27%5E0008.jpg 

After about two hours of gentle tapping and occasional frenzied hammering here's what I've managed to extract from this little lot.

First of two Plesiosaur verts.
nv27%5E0010.jpg 

Here's the second one.

nv27%5E0012.jpg 

Probable Pachystropheus phalange.

nv27%5E0009.jpg 



Two fish jaw sections. The left one broke in transit exposing a tooth.

nv27%5E0011.jpg 

Sargodon tomicus molariform tooth.

nv27%5E0014.jpg 

6" piece of Plesi(?) rib.
nv27%5E0005.jpg 






Edited by P King Chef 2009-11-27 20:38:56
Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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plottie111

Hi,
Anyone finding much recently?

Plottie
Edited by plottie111 2010-09-28 20:04:25
"Today must be my lucky day!".
Cheers
Plottie111
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rockhopper

Hi Plottie, there seems to be a few nice pieces of bonebed there at the moment, I was lucky enough to meet the excellent and very knowledgeable P King Chef and he showed me what to look for and where to look, he found a nice Pachystropheus dorsal vert when we were on the north side of the bridge which he was very very kind enough to give me.

Pachystropheus-dorsal-vert.jpg 

Here are some of my other finds.  I still have some large bits of the bone bed to break open, so the may be some more lovelies

Gill cover
gill-cover.jpg 




Gyrolepis-albertii-scales.jpg 




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rockhopper
Oops, the above is Gyrolepis albertii scales.
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rockhopper

Hybodus cloacinus shark teeth

Hybodus-cloacinus-shark-teeth.jpg 

Pete says this could be a possible partial Myriacanthus paradoxus tooth plate, but I need to show him some more pics or he would need to see it in person to give me a good ID.

partial-Myriacanthus-paradoxus-tooth-plate.jpg 

Partial Nemacanthus monilifer fin spine

[attach:fileid=uploads/1222/Partial-Nemacanthus-monilifer-fin-spine.jpg]

some more Severnichthys acuminatus teeth.

Severnichthys-acuminatus.jpg 

Severnichthys-acuminatus-2.jpg 





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plottie111

Amazing! Wish i could find things like that!

Plottie
Edited by plottie111 2010-09-28 20:05:13
"Today must be my lucky day!".
Cheers
Plottie111
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plottie111

I'm struggling to even find the Severnichthys acuminatus teeth..oh dear!

Plottie


Edited by plottie111 2010-09-28 20:06:31
"Today must be my lucky day!".
Cheers
Plottie111
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rockhopper
The Severnichthys teeth are quite common indeed. I had a lot of trouble finding the right rock to look at. But once I was shown by Pete it was quite easy to spot.

So as you look at the cliff at the top of the red sandstone you will
see the green layer, through this layer there are 3 bands of rock bed. 
the 3rd layer is what you are looking for, this is the Rhaetic bone bed.
On the floor look for the darker rock, it will have lots of light green clasts of rock cemented into it as well as darker spots of various pieces of bone/coprolite, it will also, in many cases have a very fine growth of selenite crystals on the crust, they are very small and quite loose.

Hopefully Pete will turn up soon and post some of his excellent pictures to help you out a bit more.  I will take some pics of the bonebed pieces I have, to give you a better idea of what to look for.


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rockhopper
Actually saying its dark is a bit missleading, its dark when broken, it will have two crusts, the dirty crystal type crust and the other side will be creamy coloured, it may also have rust marks on it from the high iron content.
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plottie111

Great thanks for the advice, has come in use.


Plottie

Edited by plottie111 2010-09-28 20:07:25
"Today must be my lucky day!".
Cheers
Plottie111
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rockhopper

There is another bone bed at Aust, the upper , this is younger than the Rhaetic bone bed. It very dark
and very hard. On the right hand side of the picture below, you can see a crust, if you knock this off, it breaks free quite easily, you will find some quite nice fish remains.

 
upper-Pecten-bed.jpg 

here are some lovely Severnichthys acuminatus teeth from this bed.

Aust_teeth.jpg 

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plottie111

Cheers once again incredibly useful. How do i add a photo?

Edited by plottie111 2010-09-28 20:08:37
"Today must be my lucky day!".
Cheers
Plottie111
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rockhopper
This is the best detailed picture I can take in the dark and the rain  lol  but it should give you a pretty good idea on what it will look like on the floor.

http://i47.tinypic.com/244ts3a.jpg

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plottie111

Thanks very much for passing on your knowledge to me.

Edited by plottie111 2010-09-28 20:09:21
"Today must be my lucky day!".
Cheers
Plottie111
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rockhopper
No problem, its nice to pass on the info that Pete gave me.

You could use the "full reply editor"  or upload your photo to photobucket or tinypic and link it as i have done.   
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plottie111
OK how do i do it so it will show up on this page without  a hyperlink
"Today must be my lucky day!".
Cheers
Plottie111
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rockhopper

plottie111 wrote:
OK Thanks
So these are all the right type of rock to look in
Thanks
how common are fragments of teeth and bone



It really depends, the last time I was there, there were some really good pieces and there was a lot of fragments!
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plottie111

So for a begginer what chance have i got if im looking in the right rock!


Edited by plottie111 2010-09-28 20:10:11
"Today must be my lucky day!".
Cheers
Plottie111
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rockhopper
A very good chance if you can find the right rock.  I was there last saturday. 
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rockhopper
Above the comment box there are a series of buttons starting with the spell check button, the last one, the arrow, this is the full comment editor.  Click this and you will have lots more buttons, one is an image upload button.  Images are restricted to 600px wide by 500px and image size is restricted to 200k.

Bit hard to explain, sorry

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plottie111
OK thanks i get you i will try to upload tommorow
Maybe ill se you down their some time when are you likely to next be there?

"Today must be my lucky day!".
Cheers
Plottie111
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rockhopper
Yeah, I'll keep an eye out for ya, I dont have any specific plans to go, its normally spur of the moment (basically, I sneak out when the other half goes shoppin!! lol  ) if you see anyone else tappin rocks, just ask, everyone I have met there is very friendly and will point you in the right direction.
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plottie111
OK yes have you ever tried penarth or llantwit major
If so which is easiest including aust for beginners
How many vertebraes from aust have you found!
Thanks

"Today must be my lucky day!".
Cheers
Plottie111
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rockhopper
Lol.... To be honest, I'm a beginner too, I'm yet to find a vert myself, the vert above is the only one that I have and Pete  aka P King Chef  found it and gave it to me when I met him at Aust.  I have not been to any of the welsh sites "yet" so cant really say    Are you just interested in bone?  if not, have you been to lyme, that has to be the easiest place for a beginner to find all manner of lovely things.
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P King Chef

Hi plottie,
(evening Rob),

Here's a simplified guide to the rock layers at Aust.09Feb08_004.jpg 

What is known as the Basal Bone Bed sits directly on top of the Blue Anchor Formation, from this layer upwards is the fossil bearing rocks, everything below this contains no fossils at all.

The bone bed is the most sought after rock as it contains the highest proliferation of fossil material.

When it is on the beach it can be easily spotted by the colour of the surfaces (as rock hopper has previously said).
The bottom of the bone bed (as it is in the cliff) is a creamy yellow, known as mud drape, and is usually quite flat. You may see the odd coprolite or piece of bone on here.
04_01_0.jpg 

However the top is a dark grey, more so when wet, and is quite lumpy. You may see lumps of the Blue Anchor formation, clasts, imbeded in it, these are quite distinctive and give it is lumpy appearance.

04_01_4.jpg 

You may be lucky enough to see large pieces of bone or vertebrae visible on the surface.

090808_Aust_007.jpg 


The other type of rock to look out for comes from higher up and is visible as a jagged layer sticking out of the cliff(see first pic.)

This tends to fall in fairly large chunks and when fresly fallen is covered in grass roots and a layer of shale.
On the beach it is the large rusty coloured blocks about 10 inches thick. These are always worth looking at as they weather because they can have quite large pieces of bone on them, but only on the rusty side.

My_fossils_020.jpg 

plesi_vert_001.jpg 


27032006110700.jpg 

There has been a recent fall from this layer of some large blocks, but unfortunately they have landed upside down.

nv27%5E0002.jpg 

nv27%5E0003.jpg 

The rock that rockhopper mentions is called the Pecten Bed, after the scallop like shells within it. This is also fairly fossiliferous.

Finally right at the top of the cliff is the very yellowy rock from the Cotham Member, the very early Jurassic (Hettangian or White Lias) formation.
This contains mostly shells but the odd Ichthyosaur vertebrae or Plesiosasur bone can be found with in this rock.


26042006190906.jpg 

26042006191102.jpg 


The right hand vert top row and the bottom two are from this layer.
Fossils_various_019.jpg 

Hope this is of some help to you.















Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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