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Naze Dave
Hi Ryan,
I've seen them before but i had no idea what they were till you said.
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
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ryanc
Going to head down there on Sunday - particularly interested to see the fossil tree stumps that show at low tide.
 

Cant find a great deal about them - they are embedded in the London Clay levels but they could be more recent - does anyone know their origin?

 

Incidentally if you head down to the bottom of the beach where the non steps entrance is you can find an odd layer in the rock thats actually a volcanic ashfall layer from an unknown eruption somewhere to the west of the uk around 40 million years ago.

 

Regards,

 

Ryan
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Phileas fossilis
Excellent! I take it they are not wooden 'henges' or other man placed trees. No reason why there couldnt be tree stumps somewhere in the London Clay there are plenty of trunks in it. Does it thin out there and onlap onto a soil? One way to see would be to dig a hole and see what's under the clay.
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spider
Ryan, sounds good. try and take some photos. Edited by spider 2011-07-21 09:47:40
Have a nice day :0)
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Bill G
See Fred's site, sheppeyfossils, specifically this page, for an explanation. Edited by Bill G 2011-07-21 10:55:59
Cheers, Bill
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ryanc
Theres a number of them at the far end of the beach - the preservation is different from those on the Sheppey site though.
 

Although they are embedded in the london clay they may be far more recent - the clay has been eroded for a very long time so it cant be assumed that the two are contemporaneous.

 

I did wonder if they were remnants of 'doggerland' the old land bridge between europe and the UK mainland which was slowly flooded some 6-7,000 years ago. These 'flooded forests' can be seen at many suffolk/norfolk beaches at low tide.

 


 

Regards,

 

Ryan
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ryanc
Doh! And in fact they cant be from the level of the London Clay because that was a marine deposit and these are the stumps of tree's in situ so must have been dry land or swamp.
 

Regards,

 

Ryan
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Bill G
So are they in life position, (upright)?
Cheers, Bill
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Naze Dave
Hi Ryan
I have to say i had no idea about those trees, but now you come to mention it there are indeed quite a few odd stump like structures poking up, particularly towards the northern end. And yes you are right about the volcanic layer, it is very distinctive in the cliff, again at the northern end. I may well be there on Sunday so i'll keep an eye out for you.
thanks
Dave
Still Life
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ryanc
Bill G wrote:
So are they in life position, (upright)?


 

Yes - they are literally tree stumps - the preservation isnt great and they are pretty coated in mud but identifiable.

 

Will get some pictures of them when I'm down there - the largest project a foot and a half out of the mud - others are just low mounds.

 

I assumed I'd be able to find lots about them seeing as how popular the site is with geologists and fossil hunters but apparently not.

 

Regards,

 

Ryan
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Bill G
Ah right.
 

I hadn't noticed them before. I seem to recall being told there was a wreck of a large wooden boat/ship at that end.
Cheers, Bill
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