GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
Gerald Gibson
Hello:

I found these two fossils in my backyard not far from a fossil clam I posted earlier in this forum.  In the one on the right, please note the branching which indicates it might be a coral.  I'm not sure what the other fossil is.  I learned that the formation beneath the topsoil in our yard is Middle Cretaceous (Fort Worth Formation).  Associated with the two fossils is also a fragment of an ammonite (posted at the same time as the clam), which I found in the park nearby (also of the same formation).

---- Gerald Click image for larger version - Name: Marine Fossils In Backyard.jpg, Views: 54, Size: 180.31 KB
Quote 0 0
Brittle Star
Hi

From the photos it is unclear if they are something or nothing. Please include a ruler as a scale in future. The photos are too blurry to see any surface detail.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
Quote 0 0
prep01
The Fort Worth Fm. is Carboniferous, but this looks more 'flinty' and hard. Could it have been imported? I see no evidence of any fossil(s).
Colin Huller
Quote 0 0
Gerald Gibson
Brittle Star.

The quarter shown is close enough to show size.  As far as your assumption that these aren't fossils, that is your opinion, but I think they are.  And what on earth do you mean imported? The formation below the topsoil in my yard is fossiliferous.  During construction of the house chunks of it came to the surface.   There is no importation.  I found them close to where I found a fossil clam. 

Secondly (Prep01) the Fort Worth Formation is most definitely Cretaceous, not Carboniferous. Where did you read that?  There is no Carboniferous in the DFW area of Texas. It is mostly Cretaceous.

Nevertheless, thanks for your input.

---- Gerald
Quote 0 0
Barrow Museum
Gerald,
Having spent some time over 30 years ago looking at the excellent exposures of what I believe from the ammonites to be the Duck Creek Formation, adjacent to the Fort Worth Limestone, around Lake Texoma/Denison Dam, I have a little experience of your geology.  Is it possible that you have here some burrows; trace fossils, which would be a normal occurrence in this formation?  The branching nature and even the striations, in the absence of any discernible shelly parts might point to this origin. 
Quote 0 0
prep01
Firstly, I apo;ogise for not reading your original post correctly, and I then Googled Fort Worth Formation and the resultant information came up https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=fort+wort+formstion

I am afraid I don't really understand the geology of the area and am not a geologist.
I admit that these superficially look like flint (I did mention this in my first reply) and are burrow infills.
In England we have easy access to very detailed geological survey maps and their assocated literature describing the hstorical geology which helps a lot.
Colin Huller
Quote 0 0
Gerald Gibson
Cambrian Rockhound:

Thanks for the input.  Interpretation is half the fun of finding fossils.  I found a large chunk of ammonite myself from the Fort Worth formation in my neighborhood.  An area across the street from my house is honeycombed with gryphea ("Texas Oysters").  I am fortunate to live on fossiliferous land!

---- Gerald
Quote 0 0
Gerald Gibson
Prep01

Your live in a geological wonderland for fossil hunters. Great Britain offers numerous geological periods and a vast assortment of marine and terrestrial fossils. There's too much property development in my country.
I am fortunate to live in area in Northern Texas where the original surface, though covered with topsoil, yields a variety of mollusc fossils from the Cretaceous period.

---- Gerald
Quote 0 0
Bill G
Hi Gerald, Welcome to the forum
It’s always best to either include a ruler or give a measurement
Unfortunately coins vary in size and people don’t know the size of every coin in the world.
Cheers, Bill
Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us