GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
Johnny
Julian is right the  sea only really erodes the sliff during rough weather. All teeth found on the beach will be water warn. Although you can occasionally find good stuff on the beach (I found a turtle jaw the other week) I find the slippages far more productive.
Cheers, J

Mud glorious mud.
Quote 0 0
AMARSH
Hi all
 

With any luck I'm off to the New Forest camping this weekend, and am planning a trip to Barton to see whether I can find any decent shells. Just wondered whether anyone knew the low tides for Friday, Saturday, and Sunday? I did try looking on the BBC website, but they don't appear to be updating their data Confused. Also has anyone been recently, and if so is collecting any good at the moment?

 

Andrew
Andrew Marsh
Quote 0 0
ryanc

Selsey Bill times adjusted from Portsmouth tide times:


Fri 17th Low Tide 13:27 0.93m

Sat 18th Low Tide 14:08 0.99m

Sun 19th Low Tide 14:49 1.09m

 

I didnt bother with the ones around midnight/1 AM.

 

Regards,

 

Ryan

 
Quote 0 0
AMARSH
Thanks Ryan -  much appreciated. Those aren't quite as good as I expected as I was hoping to go fossiling in the morning before my gf gets up LOL. What time is high tide on the Saturday. Just wondering if the cliff
section at Barton would be accesible at around 7am?
Andrew Marsh
Quote 0 0
Julian123
Andrew - the cliffs at Barton are accesable no matter what the tide is doing. Even at very high tide you can get to the cliffs with no danger. In fact the tides are not important if you're looking for shells.
Julian

Quote 0 0
Johnny
Julian is right, it does not matter what the tide is like, all the decent shells will be on the slippages not the beach. Given how dry it has been it shuold be perfectly safe and not sinky.  As soon as you get on the beach go straight up the cliff past the shingle. This is only covered by the sea on a storm driven spring tide, you will be fine.

Happy hunting!
Mud glorious mud.
Quote 0 0
Julian123
I was there recently and the slipages are fairly safe.
Julian

Quote 0 0
spider
Andrew, Dont forget Highcliffe which isnt far from Barton. The first 40 yards of the shingle beach to the left hand side of the jetty. If you get in the edge of the sea (hope its sunny) and look very carefully on the surf line as the waves lap in and out I'm sure you will find some nice shark teeth.
Have a nice day :0)
Quote 0 0
Julian123
Spider - most people do in fact mean Highcliff when they say Barton. I haven't found any teeth there on the beach for ages.
Julian

Quote 0 0
ryanc
High tide Sat 8:46 AM
 

Regards,

 

Ryan
Quote 0 0
spider
Julian, I have to say its been 4 years or so since I have been so I'm not sure on the productivity of the beach but we got maybe 30 teeth in a couple of hours. You have to get close to the ground right on the tide line in the waves (shoes and socks off and pants rolled up) and they appear for a few seconds and you have to grab em before they vanish in the shingle again. Lightening reflexes needed Wink
Have a nice day :0)
Quote 0 0
AMARSH
Thank you everyone for your replies. So if I was to head down there on Saturday morning, even at high tide I could collect from the cliffs? Brilliant Smile. To be honest I'd be happy to find anything as its a while since I've been fossil hunting. Having said that, number one on my whish list would have to be a nice Volutospina gastropod shell. Of course, any shark teeth I could find would be a bonus Big smile.
Andrew Marsh
Quote 0 0
Julian123
Andrew - later today I'll PM you with some details of where to look Wink
Julian

Quote 0 0
Naze Dave
The best teeth are to be found in or on the cliff towards the Highcliffe end, including some super Striatolamia sp.
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
Quote 0 0
spider
Naze Dave wrote:
The best teeth are to be found in or on the cliff towards the Highcliffe end, including some super Striatolamia sp.
Thanks

Dave

 

By the best you probably mean unworn. I suppose some wear is inevitable when they are getting bashed about mixed in with the shingle but on the waveline about 20 foot from the cliff it was very productive for numbers and some crackers amongst them. I saw one little boy with a beauty of a tooth approaching 1 1/4 - 1 1/2" long found this way.
Have a nice day :0)
Quote 0 0
ryanc
How common are those giant coin shaped forams at Barton?
 

I'd like to add a decent one of those to my collection at some point.

 

Regards,

 

Ryan
Quote 0 0
Naze Dave
Hi Spider, 
Yes thats what i meant, sorry for the mix up. If you find them in situ you can find some pristine teeth, perhaps not in great quantities though.

Ryan, if you mean Nummulites laevigatus, they are very common at Bracklesham Bay, i have a small bag of about 15+ from one trip somewhere. I've never seen any forams from Barton, other than those on dmap fossils.
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
Quote 0 0
ryanc
Naze Dave wrote:

Ryan, if you mean Nummulites laevigatus, they are very common at Bracklesham Bay, i have a small bag of about 15+ from one trip somewhere. I've never seen any forams from Barton, other than those on dmap fossils.

Thanks

Dave


 

That's the ones - giant foraminifera - pretty cool Big smile

 

Regards,

 

Ryan
Quote 0 0
Naze Dave
Yeah they are, i know Bill G has a lovely multi block of them, i have a multi block of them to from Egypt if i remember correctly (it was traded to me).
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
Quote 0 0
spider
Naze Dave wrote:
Hi Spider, 
Yes thats what i meant, sorry for the mix up. If you find them in situ you can find some pristine teeth, perhaps not in great quantities though.

Thanks

Dave

 

Hi Dave, Thanks for the clarification. I agree. Statistically speaking if you have 2 hours of high tide actually bashing against the mud slip, perhaps what fossils are left poking out of the cliff represents perhaps the last 10 minutes of peak cliff erosion, the rest of the fossils (the lions share) will be in amongst the shingle making the way down to be naturally sorted and sized amongst the shingle I think.
Have a nice day :0)
Quote 0 0
Julian123
I have to say that I've been to Barton 7 times in the last  year and have found very little in the shingle. I think the beach errosion has slowed a lot over the last few years and the sea now very rarely even touches the cliffs.
Julian

Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us