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Hi all,

Was wondering if anyone could help identify these fossils from Speeton. I’m pretty sure the first set of photos are of a chunk of partially pyratised bone. It was found lying on top of the Kimmeridge Clay beach exposures (but not directly in the clay, so could have washed up from anywhere). Could it be from an ichthyosaur or plesiosaur? Would love to know roughly what sort of bone it is. It’s longest side is about 5.5cm in length.

The other images are of belemnites from the Kimmeridge Clay, all found in situ. The first is a stunner at 19cm long and has no distinguishing features. The second is about 12.5cm long and has a deep groove running from the tip to about halfway - is this cylindroteuthis? The third is smaller, at 8cm long, and you can just make out a similar groove down half of its length from the tip.

The final 2 images are of a tooth I found in the red chalk. Is this from a shark? It’s about 1cm in length.

The beach exposures at Speeton have yielded some excellent finds for me on my last 2 trips, including some huge belemnites from the Speeton Clay. I don’t normally check the kimmeridge so I was amazed to come across these great finds!

Any help in identifying these would be much appreciated! Thanks 👍🏻👍🏻

Gillian

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TqB
Hi, Those are fine and quite rare belemnites as the Kimmeridgian isn't usually well exposed.

The furrowed ones are Cylindroteuthis obeliscoides (Pavlow & Lamplugh).
I'm not sure about the large one - it may well be a variant of the same species (and the furrowed ones get that big). They haven't really been studied properly since Pavlow & Lamplugh in 1892. They called the unfurrowed version (actually with a very faint furrow) Belemnites spicularis Phillips which is possible although his material was a bit earlier, from Scotland. It would be another cylindroteuthid anyway, probably reasonable to call it Cylindroteuthis.
Tarquin
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