GuidesMagazineToolsFossilsHunts
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Carmen76

Neogene Newbie
Registered:
Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi all,
I’m very new to fossil hunting so please bear with me as I’m trying to learn as much as I can!
Yesterday I went to a location in Suffolk in my second fossil hunt. The area has London clay, coralline crag and red crag. Near the shore there were some interesting small stones. I looked under the roots of a fallen tree and found some larger stones all together. They look bone shaped and one is a bit like a tooth. I could only find one example of the marks on the stones that suggest they could be annelid trace fossils?
Also in this location I found a large lump of clay with what I though looked like scales on it?
Any help with identification would be great. Thankyou!

Attached Images
Click image for larger version - Name: 4650CDB4-0230-4B49-B137-661BC9186391.jpeg, Views: 23, Size: 2.13 MB  Click image for larger version - Name: A6C52005-8656-484C-BD52-62005E9682C8.jpeg, Views: 20, Size: 632.18 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: 3D939D1A-818A-44A4-8699-7B57124EE8CB.jpeg, Views: 19, Size: 661.80 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: 003B2B60-4587-41C9-9E75-727117D49F03.jpeg, Views: 17, Size: 595.66 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: 05C444BA-559B-4604-AB30-39FCDAA5F816.jpeg, Views: 16, Size: 544.02 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: C445202F-9734-4C2A-99D1-842241B6D5E9.jpeg, Views: 18, Size: 547.48 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: EDA941F2-C125-49C7-AC9E-46414FCDC0EC.jpeg, Views: 19, Size: 750.85 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: 5D429E08-85DA-4257-A4E9-F46B4064B104.jpeg, Views: 18, Size: 337.53 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: 04C6796F-BB14-4417-9CF6-C7A1BF303F36.jpeg, Views: 16, Size: 553.55 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: C89B9B8E-BBC4-4B81-85B0-51AA801F2649.jpeg, Views: 14, Size: 532.38 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: 0EE97183-5D7A-408A-8D44-1590BA00385B.jpeg, Views: 13, Size: 508.95 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: A00FCD1A-D5DC-488F-9A63-AD5949130C24.jpeg, Views: 13, Size: 561.22 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: 3B6FA057-0485-44E5-9CA3-859959C91BC5.jpeg, Views: 21, Size: 505.35 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: FFD4FB22-2A7F-411C-B6BE-BD9772FAFD2D.jpeg, Views: 23, Size: 3.98 MB 

0
prep01

Avatar / Picture

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 2,674
Reply with quote  #2 
Hello Carmen and welcome to the forum. I'm afraid I don't see any fossils in your collection. I think they are all modern worm / gastropos feeding tracks apart from the last one which is a crumbly rock, possibly pyritic.
__________________
Colin Huller
0
Carmen76

Neogene Newbie
Registered:
Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for your reply!
What would cause the brown stones to be that shape? Some of them look almost like bone shapes And one is tooth shaped. They were the only ones like it and the larger ones were clustered together. I spent hours yesterday on the internet trying to find out what sort of stone I it was and couldn’t find anything.... in fact it just confused me more!
0
Brittle Star

Avatar / Picture

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 533
Reply with quote  #4 
Hi,

Colin pic 7, if you look closely it has deep dimples, could that possibly be fossilized root, not sure if some of other photos are of same piece or not. Or if location is not the right age.

Carmen, unfortunately you get a lot of pseudo fossils, rocks that have shapes like fossils. Bone usually has a honeycomb structure, and teeth preserve really well and look like teeth and can be really sharp. Flint is particularly good at imitating things.

__________________
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
0
Carmen76

Neogene Newbie
Registered:
Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #5 
They were found at Ramsholt in Suffolk
The photo after no7 is the same rock on its side. It has a dark outer ring and is lighter in the middle. They are also quite heavy.
0
Carmen76

Neogene Newbie
Registered:
Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #6 
As it’s not bone I thought I’d see what it was like inside. I hit it with an axe and it broke into lots of little bits. One of the little bits has a tiny hole going through it.

Attached Images
Click image for larger version - Name: A7B24F84-4E78-46E7-A32E-90AF16038370.jpeg, Views: 16, Size: 663.53 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: 7237B299-C79D-4893-B470-C53DBF03639A.jpeg, Views: 13, Size: 433.76 KB 

0
prep01

Avatar / Picture

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 2,674
Reply with quote  #7 
Hello Carmen, firstly have you read this? https://ukfossils.co.uk/2005/01/24/ramsholt/


Your darker bits look similar to the crab / lobster bits, but I'm not convinced!
Janet, I see what you mean but there's 300.000+ between the deposits.

__________________
Colin Huller
0
Carmen76

Neogene Newbie
Registered:
Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #8 
Yes I have read that. It was actually my starting point to find somewhere good to go in Dorset, I enjoyed it so much I looked up places nearer to where I live! Brilliant site, I’m learning lots. Thankyou!
**I didn’t actually see the photos before but now I see what you meant about them looking like the lobster bits!
0
Unregistered
Reply with quote  #9 
Hello Carmen,

        What you have here are flint & iron stone nodules, very common at Ramsholt & also very good at looking like what you want to find. I'm quite familiar with the site myself & have been a few times over the last couple of months. Ramsholt has two significant layers exposed, London Clay & Red Crag, both of which are high yield deposits at this site. As others have said, the Eocene shark teeth have a distinctive shape & are quite often highly polished due to being redeposited in the later Red Crag. Bone from both layers can be found & you should be looking for a grain, like wood but heavy like stone. I have posted a few pics on my instagram account if you are able to view those, my acc name is Connah.
  Good luck & keep looking, you'll find something wonderful soon no doubt.

  Connah.


0
Carmen76

Neogene Newbie
Registered:
Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #10 
Thank you Connah.
I’m almost blown away by the amount there is for a newbie to learn about fossil hunting! We picked the wrong time to go there really as the tide was coming in when we went so we only had about 45 mins to look about. It is a lovely site and I will definitely be going back to have another look at some point at low tide.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.



Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2018 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us