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petefromhackney
I found this two weeks ago on the foreshore at base of cliffs Bouldnor on the Isle of Wight.  Is it turtle shell, bone fragment ?  What do you think. DSCN4384.jpg  DSCN4385.jpg  DSCN4386.jpg  DSCN4387.jpg   
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P King Chef
Looks like a piece of pottery to me.
Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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prep01
I agree, certainly not fossil, so I would say pottery.
Colin Huller
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Brittle Star
Hi

You can get turtle shell there, the photo is not really showing the signs of turtle shell.
You do get lines on the shell. Can you can see a honeycomb struction in the middle when you look edge On? Your photo is a bit dark. I have not seen turtle shell that shape or with the texture shown on your photo however.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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andrasz

Hmmm...

Would need to hold it in hand to feel texture, weight, etc. The shape does resemble a piece of waterworn ceramics, but the colour does not appear right, it does resemble that of old (not necessarily fossilised) bone. I have seen ice age mammoth tusks disintegrate in that manner, would leave that as an option until disproven. 

Edit:

Another option is that it's a fragment on an Aetobatis (Eagle ray) tooth plate, the shape and striations are very reminescent of much smaller ones I have from the Oligocene of Fayum (Egypt). If indeed it is a part of a tooth plate, it is HUGE, but modern species of the genus do grow to 3 metres, they may well have been much larger in the past, I'm no expert on them.

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Brittle Star
Another thought, try taking photos in natural light, the first ones are a bit too dark to make out the surface
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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P King Chef
A piece of black burnished ware maybe? Certainly not turtle related.
Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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Fossilamn14
Hi, unfortunately that it neither bone or turtle. The turtle and bone and Bouldnor will be black with a honeycomb structure to it, they will be in the small areas of shingle on the foreshore and the best bits are in situ particularly at mud flat corner/ Cranmore ledge.
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