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Fossil hunter
A day off from work,I decided to visit Burnham on crouch for the first time in hope to find some shark tooth. I only managed to find a couple of complete shark tooth but some small crabs and a possible starfish?
Here's some pictures of the site and my finds.
1505146_642649679191666_4846694928541290155_n.jpg 

10408602_642649605858340_5701706425066820745_n.jpg 

10305430_642649252525042_6846820278233787477_n.jpg 

14012_642649542525013_8909868432688509159_n.jpg 

10455437_642649585858342_8038751028358245035_n.jpg 
Shark tooth
10712782_642649899191644_5980519167815934604_n.jpg 
Worm tubes
8996_642649972524970_1400888963911412425_n.jpg 
Gastropods
10931472_642649919191642_6930727666844028597_n.jpg 
Ray tooth 
10408662_642650059191628_5326069065688229670_n.jpg 
Fish vertebra
10405231_642650035858297_913271973729162056_n.jpg 
Glyphithyreus wetherelli crab
10372501_642649952524972_7306747006700434830_n.jpg 

10388642_642650195858281_6485477786911778284_n.jpg 

10896935_642650275858273_7379859774784016518_n.jpg 

10923318_642650165858284_2596319063748270040_n.jpg 
Dorsal view
10915276_642650099191624_3214981384279160765_n.jpg 
Ventral view of the above specimen
1623345_642650132524954_6649754574165883750_n.jpg 
Starfish(Coulonia colei)?? or just a pyrite clump??
10806366_642650015858299_1203647766350821052_n.jpg 
Other view of the above specimen
10888542_642649985858302_5343898130691931277_n.jpg 
Thanks for watching. Any ideas of the last specimen's ID would be much appreciated.  
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beatpete
Looks like a lump of pyrite with a bit of ammonite on, like those Crucilobiceras found at Charmouth
Beatpete
----------------
Anywhere for little ammonites, twice as far for big ones!
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Fossil hunter
Hi,beatpete
The deposit at Burnham on crouch is from Eocene London Clay division D so ammonite would be unlikely.
It's just that the edge of the specimen has square plates resembling pyritic specimens of Coulonia colei[Asteropecten colei] from 'London Clay Fossils of Kent and Essex' by David Rayner,Tony Mitchell,Martin Rayner and Fred Clouter.
The image below is from Fred's website.
[attach:fileid=uploads/1195/starfish_cast_on_septarian.jpg]

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jennie0212
Hi

I believe that bottom fossil is pyritized  plant matter.

 I am putting on a Display of fossils found on Creeksea beach, in Burnham on Crouch's museum this year when we open this April it will run through till the end of October (when we close for the winter) if anyone is in the area you may find it interesting to pop in with a wide range of shark, ray and fish teeth, many different pyrite fossils including plant matter, seeds and gastrpods, belemnites and lots more. The museum is open Wednesday, Saturdays and Sundays and is only ƒâ€š‚£1.50 entry for adults and 20p for children.

Thanks 

Jennie
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Elbert


Hello, the last two pics show a partial (an arm of a)  starfish, wich is pyritised, nice material!


greetings, Bert

the search is as valuable as the finds...
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jennie0212
I hate to disagree but I have never seen a starfish arm any where near that wide, however as England sat a further south during the Eocene coupled with the proto-jet stream, the environment as more a kin to the tropics with ferns and tropical plants, and to me that is what this looks like.

Jennie
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Elbert

Hello Jennie, please don`t be afraid to disagree; it is the combined knowledge wherewith we solve most of the riddles that present themselves here and it is inevitable that we disagree  from time to time wich makes that we keep learning and growing.

I recognized this starfish because I have seen similar, but far better preserved, starfish from Italy.

It was confirmed by "British Caenozoic fossils" from the BM in wich, on page 39, item 5, a piece is shown of two arms attached, but otherwise virtually identical.

In this book it is named: Archastropecten crispatus.

This piece is also London Clay and found at the isle of Sheppey.


greetings, Bert

the search is as valuable as the finds...
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jennie0212
Ok hun, I do have that that book so I think will re-check my random pyrite against it again tomorrow, I was largely going on my experience of what I have found down Creeksea beach if I am honest, I am putting on my 1st display of Eocene fossils at the moment and have only ever found starfish arms that are slender by comparison. I always welcome help and advice.


that link should take you to a photo of my main display cabinet, if anyone is interested

thanks

Jennie
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TqB
I agree with Elbert, starfish arm, and the Archastropecten looks pretty close .
Tarquin
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jennie0212
Some of my finds from Creeksea cliffs Burnham on crouchTiny_Urchin_Top.jpg this tiny urchin is just 2mm across
Display.jpg  my display table at the Burnham on crouch museum, where my display will run from 1st April till 31st October 
(no I did not find the larger 3 urchins but they had already been donated to the museum and I did find the other 3 smaller flint urchins and the tiny one and a small pyrite one)
IMG00104.jpg one of the two up-right cabinets for shark, ray and fish teeth and vertebrae
[attach:fileid=uploads/3348/anomotodon_sheppeyensis.jpg]
Anomotodon Sheppeyensis teeth, I could put up pictures of all the teeth tomorro if anyone is interested?
thanks
Jennie
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Fossil hunter
Thanks,Jennie,Elbert and TqB for helping with the ID.
I was personally thinking it of a single arm of a starfish too as there seems to be the square plates on the edges and parts where other arms might have originally existed.
I have drawn an imagining whole specimen based on mine below.
By the way,that's an impressive collection of shark tooth and fossils Jennie. Do you have any Hexanchus shark teeth from Butts cliff? 20150305_195449_resized.jpg 

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Elbert

Hello Jennie, impressive display!

If it was`t  for the water, I`d come over and have a look; near where I live in Holland is one of the very rare dutch  locations where it is possible to also find Eocene material although the Miocene and Pliocene

dominate the finds.

So it can not be compaired with what you have in the UK; but it would still be interesting to compare the Eocene material...

And yes,  please show some sharksteeth; most of what we find are those.


greetings, Bert


the search is as valuable as the finds...
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jennie0212
much more obvious seeing it like that, and yes I have weltonia burhamensis, hexanchus collinsonae, hexanchus agassizi and notorynchus serratissimus. I can post some pictures of them tomorrow if you want?

Jennei
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jennie0212
all the teeth I have found are up the museum, but I will take photos of them all tomorrow and post them on here when I get home.

Jennie

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Fossil hunter
Hi,
Yes,that would be nice! Thanks.
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mr ammonites
That is  wonderful display. It is so interesting to see the animal the teeth came from, it brings the fossils back to life, so to speak. 
I hope all the visitors appreciate you effort and learn something.

Ammonite!
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beatpete
Hi all
The Anomotodon sheppeyensis in the last picture looks very much like the famous Goblin shark,
Mitsukurina owstoni
 
Beatpete
----------------
Anywhere for little ammonites, twice as far for big ones!
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jennie0212
hi,
Thank you,  and all the pictures I use, are used with permission of the gentleman who wrote a guide book on the Dengie fossil (had I have had to draw them they would be akin to stickmen.lol) but the Anomotodon Sheppeyensis is a goblin shark.
IMG00106.jpg 

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Fossil hunter
Managed to take some close ups.
IMG_4562.JPG 

IMG_4561.JPG 

IMG_4558.JPG 

IMG_4556.JPG 
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Elbert

Hello, lovely little crab, beautifull preservation; is the pyrite from this location easy to keep from blooming? You`ll probably have to keep it in a dry cool place...


greetings, Bert (the hun)

the search is as valuable as the finds...
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Fossil hunter
Thanks,Elbert.
I guess pyrite disease is common with these so I would keep it in a dry cool place.
 
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jennie0212
If you coat your pyrite with P.V.A ( I normally water it down a bit) it seals it from the air and prevents deterioration (and as it is water based it can be washed off if you want to remove it)

Jennie
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Julian123
jennie0212 wrote:
If you coat your pyrite with P.V.A ( I normally water it down a bit) it seals it from the air and prevents deterioration (and as it is water based it can be washed off if you want to remove it)

Jennie



PVA does work but once it has dried it cannot be washed off, and in fact it will peel off after a while anyway. I find nail varnish works better.

Julian

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prep01
A little more expensive, but much better and used by many people nowasays is Paraloid B72 (a form of Perspex) which is  dissolved in Actone  and is reverable!
Colin Huller
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jennie0212
You had me worried for a minute but it does wash off I have just cleaned one with fairy and warm water, as for Paraloid B72, I prefer working with HMG but if I wanted to remove it would the acetone not cause problems? I have got to be honest I am new to this fossil collecting but I have done a great deal of work restoring pre-historic pottery ( Bronze and Iron age and a awful lot of Roman) and it is the techniques I learnt with regards to pottery, metal, glass and bone restoration and preservation that I draw on when it comes to the fossil. 

Today's small finds (not had time to open my bag yet just the tubs from my pocket)
todays_small_finds.jpg 
todays_shark_teeth.jpg 

Thanks

Jennie
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Fossil hunter
Hi,Jennie
That's a good haul of shark teeth and crab nodules. Nice finds.
Could you take any close ups pictures of the crabs?
Fossil hunter
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jennie0212
hi Fossil hunter,

I camera is a lousy phone camera but here are the ones that were not to bad
IMG00200.jpg 
IMG00201.jpg 
one side
IMG00202.jpg 
other side

sorry cameras rubbish 

Jennie

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Fossil hunter
Thanks,Jennie.
The last specimen looks very well preserved.
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jennie0212
thanks, here is a photo of some of the crabs I have found up Creeksea
lots_of_crabs.JPG 
 the one in the middle of the top row is my favorite.
Jennie
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Fossil hunter
Nice collection of crabs there.Thanks for sharing.
Here's some of my collection of crabs/lobster from London clay(various locations)

IMG_4563.JPG 
IMG_4564.JPG 

IMG_4569.JPG 

IMG_4565.JPG 

IMG_4574.JPG 

IMG_4566.JPG 

IMG_4570.JPG 
IMG_4571.JPG 

IMG_4572.JPG 
IMG_4573.JPG 

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jennie0212
They look really good hun, 

Jennie
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