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GrahamfromScarborough
Please can anyone identify the brachiopod fossil that I found on Scarborough beach yesterday?
At least I think that is what it is, after looking it up on the 'Natural History Museum' app!
The nearest I could match it with was kallirhychnia yaxleyensis.

I am retired, collect rocks and fossils whilst walking, but I am just a novice at identifying my finds!

Thanks in anticipation of your help. 
Graham Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190917_135037.jpg, Views: 38, Size: 166.60 KB
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prep01
Hello, It wcould well be a derived fossil as is the Siphonodendron  coral in front of it! I would need to see photos from all angles of this brachiopod and a ruler in each photo please.
Colin Huller
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GrahamfromScarborough
Thank you Prep01,
Sorry about forgetting a rule!
I have attached some photos as requested.
Thank you for your help.
Graham
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Barrow Museum

Your "brachiopod" is, I am fairly sure, the fossil oyster bivalve called Lopha.  It is characterised by those coarse radial plications on the shell.  It occurs fairly regularly in Jurassic sediments, and could easily be derived from local Scarborough Jurassic strata, although a more distant glacial origin is also possible.  I agree with Colin's coral identification and that it comes from Carboniferous Limestone, probably somewhere in Northern England, carried to where you found it in ice-borne "Till".

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Dirty Pete
Hi Graham,
I think some of it's missing however google Lopha gregaria and see what you think. Interesting the way the ornamentation/ribs bifurcates.
Cheers
Pete
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GrahamfromScarborough
Thank you Colin, Pete and Barrow Museum for all that information. 
It is good to find somewhere that help can be found. 
Graham
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prep01
I agree, Lopha sp.
Colin Huller
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