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Dream Weaver

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Reply with quote  #51 
Ditto^

Another real belter there, Tarquin!! Thanks for sharing...



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Reply with quote  #52 
Thanks, guys - some of this stuff is quite ordinary until you get up close...

Here's one I posted a while back but I've rephotographed.

Lithostrotion decipiens, from the Arnsbergian Harlow Hill Limestone, Northumberland, apparently showing the colony surface.

IMG_1279_-_Copy.JPG 

IMG_1280_-_Copy_1a.JPG 









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Reply with quote  #53 
That's exquisite!!  Did you chemically prep that one, Tarquin? 


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Reply with quote  #54 
Thanks, Geth - no prep, it's just as found.


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Reply with quote  #55 


I took this picture last month - it wasnt actually the focus of the picture so its not great but it does show remarkable similarities to your fossil!
 
[attach:fileid=uploads/1549/coralcolony.jpg]
 
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Ryan
 
 
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Reply with quote  #56 

Thanks, Ryan, it's remarkable that such distantly related orders of polyp have secreted the same support structure.

Whereabouts does that live? 


Edited by TqB 2012-02-18 09:54:49

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Reply with quote  #57 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TqB
Thanks, Ryan, it's remarkable that such distantly related orders of polyp have secreted the same support structure.

Whereabouts does that live? 



 

That one lives in the aquarium at London Zoo LOL but its a tropical species. I guess once you start living as a colony theres not really that many shapes that are effecient to stack together so there's a tendency to end up as hexagons like the individual cells in a beehive.

 

This is quite handy when your trying to figure out what now extinct species might have looked like :)

 

You can see the small coral in my picture has a lot more irregularly shaped polyps than yours so I guess you could use the regularity of the individual polyp shapes to estimate something about the size of the original when you only find a fragment?

 

I have visited quite a number of aquariums recently but cant seem to find one with a modern crinoid in the UK - the nearest seems to be in Calais so a good excuse to nip over there :)

 

Regards,

 

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Reply with quote  #58 
I'd like to see a live crinoid too - perhaps take up diving?



Very pleased to pick this one up out of a stream, about a foot deep where I just noticed it as a spotty rock.

It's Lonsdaleia duplicata again, like the nice green pebble one a few posts ago, and is fairly recently fallen from the spoil heap of a Great Limestone quarry near Frosterley.
So only the second I've seen from here, still can't find another local record.

Finding it there removes a niggling doubt that the other one could have been an erratic from the other side of the Pennines (it was about 1km downstream from this one and could easily have got there after a few floods.)

IMG_1298_-_Copy.JPG 
IMG_1298_-_Copy_2.JPG 





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Reply with quote  #59 
Really glad to see this "high Carb." diet is panning out well for you, mate... Another real corker of a find! Well played...

ps. Have you checked with anyone at the NHM in London to see if they have any record of Lonsdaleia sp. from your area? Could be worth a punt, I'm thinking...

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Reply with quote  #60 
By the by, for what it's worth - which admittedly might not be much - I for one hope this thread continues to grow and grow, much like the various bug and snail threads have over the months and years.

More Carb corals please, ladies and gents!!!



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Reply with quote  #61 


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dream Weaver
Really glad to see this "high Carb." diet is panning out well for you, mate... Another real corker of a find! Well played...

ps. Have you checked with anyone at the NHM in London to see if they have any record of Lonsdaleia sp. from your area? Could be worth a punt, I'm thinking...


Thanks, Geth!

No, good idea but I haven't asked yet - there's lots of the cerioid (honeycomb) Lonsdaleia (ed: now Actinocyathus) from here (floriformis or laticlavia) but the fasciculate, branching one usually called L. duplicata only turns up 20 miles away in the Survey memoirs (so it shouldn't be surprising...).

It's possible that they're sometimes growth forms of the same species - there are intermediates where just some of the corallites fuse.

Edited by TqB 2012-03-21 16:10:59

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Reply with quote  #62 
Here's another Lithostrotion sp. showing the calices - from the Great Scar Limestone near Brough.

IMG_1282_-_Copy.JPG 
IMG_1283_-_Copy.JPG 


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Reply with quote  #63 
A pebble that I picked up this week - looks like rock art...

A small (2cm) Caninia on the right with a bit of Diphyphyllum on the left (and a piece of Koninckophyllum in the middle).

IMG_1337_-_Copy.JPG 
IMG_1338_-_Copy.JPG 


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Reply with quote  #64 
Here's a 3D Aulophyllum fungites,  I've put sections of this species on here but not found one like this before. (Great Limestone, Weardale).

IMG_1294_-_Copy.JPG 
IMG_1295_-_Copy.JPG 


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Reply with quote  #65 


Impressive selection of corals!
I've had these sitting on the shelf for a while now. Found in a sideshoot of the river Clydach
below Brynmawr, South Wales, so are Carboniferous. They covered the fast flowing stream
bed for many m2. I'm struggling to find an ID, can any of you coral heads suggest a name?
 
IMG_0299_Copy.JPG 
 
IMG_0298_Copy.JPG   
 
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Reply with quote  #66 

Hi, nice specimen! - I think it's a Siphonodendron ( formerly Lithostrotion), S. pauciradiale or similar.


Edited by TqB 2013-09-29 21:15:48

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Reply with quote  #67 


Thanks Tarquin.
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Dream Weaver

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Reply with quote  #68 
Very nice, Dirty Pete... Well played!

Just a humble personal request, mind, but I think I speak for many when I say please keep these gorgeous Carb corals coming, folks... Makes a very nice change from snails and trilos (as lovely as they also are).





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Reply with quote  #69 
totally agree .. love seeing all fossils but corals seem to have been missed for a while  
 

Clap

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Reply with quote  #70 
Glad there are a few like minded anthozoophiles out there.

Here's a small section of the very common Dibunophyllum bipartitum that caught my eye last week.

1cm scale bar.

IMG_1340_-_Copy.JPG 





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Reply with quote  #71 

love the detail on that pic tarquin


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Reply with quote  #72 

Thanks, Gary!

This stream recently (this winter) disappeared into a newly opened up sinkhole - this section of Great Limestone, packed with corals, is usually mostly under water:

DSC01569_-_Copy.JPG 


Here's my favourite wild Lonsdaleia (ed: now Actinocyathus) - my boots would normally be under water:
DSC01564_-_Copy_1a.JPG 










Edited by TqB 2012-03-21 16:11:54

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Reply with quote  #73 


Wild Lonsdaleia (ed: now Actinocyathus) closeups: (Edit: I haven't collected this, I've got good loose material and this should really stay there!)

DSC01566_-_Copy.JPG 
DSC01565_-_Copy.JPG 




Edited by TqB 2012-03-21 16:12:28

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Reply with quote  #74 


wow  Lonsdaleia is on my to find list

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Reply with quote  #75 

And a bed of Frosterley Marble, mostly Dibunophyllum bipartitum, again usually under water:

DSC01586_-_Copy.JPG 
DSC01584.JPG 


Edited by TqB 2012-03-04 20:03:00

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Reply with quote  #76 




any suggestions guys on a species for this one  guess is zaphrentis,, coral is upper carboniferous in age
 
 
 
sectiond piece
03_04_29.JPEG 
 
 
a.JPEG 
 
 
03_04_38.JPEG 

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Reply with quote  #77 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TqB

This stream recently (this winter) disappeared into a newly opened up sinkhole



 

Interesting Karst dynamic - I wonder if the dry winter and thus low water table levels caused that?

 

We live on top of a concealed Karst landscape (covered by glacial clays) but you can still spot the signs with swallow-holes, half ploughed out sinkholes and lots of springs locally.

 

In the next road to my sister the front of a house collapsed one night into a fresh sinkhole - after investigation they figured that was down to historically low water table.

 

I guess the chalk started to dry out and crack and could then no longer support the load.

 

Bit of luck for you though eh :)

 

Regards,

 

Ryan
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Reply with quote  #78 
Gary - "Zaphrentis" looks OK but species are very tricky, there are loads of them, often grouped into different genera or subgenera.

Ryan - it was quite a surprise, the winter's not been particularly dry up here but someone told me there'd been an earth tremor last year that shook stuff up in the old lead mines; I wonder if it unblocked an old sinkhole.

I should emphasise that I haven't collected this one - it's firmly attached to the bedrock and long may it remain so!



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Reply with quote  #79 
Now that's what I call a "responsible collector"!


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Reply with quote  #80 
Kind of you to say so, Colin! - actually, all the collected specimens on this thread were found loose, mostly as stream pebbles (admittedly, one of the "pebbles" weighs nearly a hundredweight...).

Saves a lot of hammering and polishing!



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Reply with quote  #81 
Love those in-situ pics, Tarquin! Sincerely, thanks for sharing... 


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Reply with quote  #82 

Thanks, Geth - I'm hoping to polish one of my loose pieces to match that in situ Actinocyathus.

Syringopora again - a bit average at first glance and the detail has been largely obscured by recrystallisation/silicification:
IMG_1442_-_Copy.JPG 


IMG_1468_-_Copy.JPG 

IMG_1468_-_Copy_-_Copy.JPG 








Edited by TqB 2012-03-21 16:13:50

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Reply with quote  #83 
From the Melmerby Scar Limestone (upper Asbian), high moors near Cow Green, Teesdale.

Common and characteristic (the only one I found though), Siphonodendron (Lithostrotion) martini.

Specimen 18cm across, corallites 6-8mm.

IMG_1557_-_Copy.JPG 



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Reply with quote  #84 
S. martini closeups:

IMG_1579_-_Copy.JPG 
IMG_1579_-_Copy_2.JPG 


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Reply with quote  #85 
Longitudinal section:
IMG_1559_-_Copy.JPG 



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Reply with quote  #86 
Fabulous corals Tarquin, keep a look out for encrusting bryozoa please !!
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Reply with quote  #87 
Many thanks, poly, I've just posted one separately! 


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Reply with quote  #88 
Found today, a small (4cm square) piece of Actinocyathus (Lonsdaleia) floriformis with nicely weathered out silicified dissepiments.

IMG_1615_-_Copy.JPG 
IMG_1615_-_Copy_3.JPG 


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Reply with quote  #89 
Isn't nature brilliant! You get A******** for that one Tarquin!!!!!!


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Reply with quote  #90 
Beautiful stuff, really lovely.
Thanks
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Reply with quote  #91 


Another great coral - you have shown a number where the originally calcite coral has been replaced with silica - have you read any explanations of this preservation?
 
Regards,
 
Ryan
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Reply with quote  #92 
Thanks very much guys;  Ryan, I haven't found an explanation yet that explains how the silica replaces the original calcite skeleton but ends up with calcite in the voids - or indeed where the silica comes from, biogenic or otherwise.


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Reply with quote  #93 
Love the Corals Tarquin
the preserved detail is amazing

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Reply with quote  #94 
Yep amazing detail well done Tarquin.
 

Lee

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Reply with quote  #95 
Many thanks, Lee & Wenlock - it's mostly pebbles really!


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Reply with quote  #96 
Not a coral although it was thought to be a tabulate one until quite recently - the calcisponge Chaetetes sp..

I thought it was patches of lichen at first glance but it's a very thin (1mm) sheet of calcite sponge with silicified patches that have weathered out. The individual tubes are  0.20 - 0.25 mm across.

IMG_1647_-_Copy.JPG 
IMG_1646_-_Copy.JPG 


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Reply with quote  #97 
Chaetetes closeups:

IMG_1646_-_Copy_2a.JPG 

IMG_1646_-_Copy_3.JPG 

IMG_1646_-_Copy_4.JPG 



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Reply with quote  #98 
Lov 'em Tarquin!!!

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Reply with quote  #99 
Thanks, Colin.

I think this one's a Koninckophyllum, probably K. interruptum - first time I've posted one, I've got a few other bits but they need polishing.
IMG_1642_-_Copy.JPG 
IMG_1642_-_Copy_2.JPG 


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Reply with quote  #100 
TS of the last Koninckophyllum:
IMG_1644_-_Copy_1.JPG 



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