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valh
Hi Curt! Superb specimen!
Valerij
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CurtKnap
Thanks Valerij!
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TqB
Another interestingly mineralised Actinocyathus floriformis from the Great Limestone, Weardale. Found and cut this month.

Scale bar 1cm.

IMG_2552.jpg 

IMG_2551.jpg 

IMG_2553.jpg 



Tarquin
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Hydrangea

Another beauty Tarquin, excellent preparation and pictures (as always).
Roy D.
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CurtKnap
I'll second that, Roy - and beautiful mineralisation, as Tarquin notes.
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TqB
Thanks, Roy & Curt - it's getting harder to find these in the dales, only partly my fault...[smile]
Tarquin
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CurtKnap
Here's a small (only 1cm or so in diameter) coral from the Brigantian of north Wales. It's probably a juvenile Dibunophyllum bipartitum, despite the superficial resemblance to Axophyllum.



IMG_2740.JPG 
IMG_2742.JPG
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Hydrangea

Nice one Curt, great picture, interesting bluish halo around it.

regards.
Roy D.
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TqB
Nice specimen, Curt, you're probably right. Dibunophyllum can be very misleading when the central dividing lamella isn't there.

Here are four consecutive sections, taken over about 2cm length, of what I'm calling D. bipartitum konincki (not that I like sub-species...) which does something similar for a while. The first section is the youngest and is "normal".
(There's a bit of a bluish silicified halo here too.)

IMG_2672.jpg 

IMG_2676.jpg 

IMG_2679.jpg 

IMG_2681.jpg
Tarquin
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prep01
You using a stacking prog now Tarquin?
Colin Huller
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TqB
prep01 wrote:
You using a stacking prog now Tarquin?


Not yet, Colin, but I want to. I just go to about f16 to get depth of field - OK with the camera mounted on a copy stand. 
Tarquin
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CurtKnap
Thanks Roy; as Tarquin notes, the halo is silicified.

Lovely sequence there, Tarquin. I see a distinct similarity between the specimen I posted and the middle couple of sections from yours. I have just a thin slice of matrix though; not really enough to section further. There does seem to be significant variation amongst 'D. bipartitum', so there have been several sub-species named, as you know...I've never been really convinced though.
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TqB
I agree, they all join up I think.
Tarquin
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Hydrangea

Very nice specimen Tarquin, interesting to see the changes as the coral has grown. 

regards
Roy D.
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valh
Hi Tarquin! An interesting specimen!

dibunvar.jpgDibunophyllum осевые структуры.jpg 
Valerij
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TqB
Roy & Valerij, thanks!

Valerij - good summary figure.
Tarquin
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TqB
A green Aulophyllum fungites! - from the Great Limestone of Weardale, as found (photographed covered with water).

I'll section it later - the ones in this crinoidal limestone are usually very well preserved with transparent calcite infill. They're rare in this matrix but I keep a special look out for them.

IMG_2763.jpg 

IMG_2765.jpg 


Tarquin
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Hydrangea

Another nice one Tarquin. 
Do you think the copper staining is recent?
To me it looks like a woman's head and shoulder silhouette in that crinoid to the left of the coral!!

regards.
Roy D.
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CurtKnap
Looks a promising one, Tarquin; I look forward to seeing the section/s. This is a fascinating genus that I have only found a few examples of.

Roy - I see what you mean; looks like a coin!
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TqB
Thanks, Curt & Roy. I completely agree about the crinoid bit, hadn't noticed!

Yes, the staining will be recent - it won't have been in the stream for more than a few decades and that's where all the stained ones are.
Tarquin
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valh
Hi Tarquin! A unique specimen! The green color of calcite can be caused by local manifestation of copper in this area.
Valerij
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TqB
Thanks, Valerij, I believe you're right. There are many old lead mines in the area and small quantities of copper are present.
Tarquin
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Daniel
Can anyone ID this? I found it on the Holderness coast yesterday.


Thanks,

Daniel

Click image for larger version - Name: 98681EAF-C0C3-498E-8B95-C059210C5F6E.jpeg, Views: 29, Size: 8.04 MB Click image for larger version - Name: 7F4C01B3-F28E-413B-BBD8-23F42F361A3D.jpeg, Views: 30, Size: 4.69 MB
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CurtKnap
Hi Daniel,

That's a nice colony showing the calicular surface. It's probably an Actinocyathus sp. - look at examples of this genus earlier on this thread (needs a section to be sure).

Great find, by the way; Roy ('Hydrangea') has collected a lot of Carboniferous erratic material from the Holderness coast, with some fine examples posted on this thread.

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Daniel
Thanks for your help
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Hydrangea

A very good find Daniel, you'll have to try polishing it.
Roy D.
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Daniel
Thanks.
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CurtKnap
Here's my rarest coral find from 2017, a very worn beach cobble from East Lothian: my first and only specimen of Thysanophyllum orientale.

The matrix is a very pale limestone and the preservation makes it difficult to photograph, but it's rarity makes it worth posting. I have not actually sectioned it, but just ground down flattish faces of the cobble. The whole thing is about 85mm x 65mm, with the largest corallites about 20mm in diameter.

Natural appearance showing transverse sections of corallites:
1a.jpg 

Contrast enhanced and with 1cm scale:
1b.jpg 

Close-ups:
3b.jpg 
5b.jpg 
6b.jpg 

Partial longitudinal sections:
7b.jpg  8b.jpg  9b.jpg 


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Hydrangea

A nice find Curt and well prepped! Beautiful!
Roy D.
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CurtKnap
Thanks, Roy!
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TqB
Excellent find and very attractive, Curt. One I've not seen apart from in Dorothy's monograph. 😉
Tarquin
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prep01
Aestheticall loverly!
Colin Huller
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CurtKnap
Thanks gents. It's the only one I've ever seen outside the monograph too, Tarquin.
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CurtKnap
Admin - I'm surprised the last post from DumaFossil (#1483) on this Carboniferous Corals thread got through the current vetting process. Could it please be removed? Thanks.
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CurtKnap
For various reasons, I've not been out collecting as much as usual this year. However, here's my best Carboniferous coral find of 2018 (found in February). It's a Brigantian Orionastraea (probably phillipsi) from north Wales.

Orionastraea phillipsi 1.jpg 
Orionastraea phillipsi 2.jpg 
Orionastraea phillipsi 3.jpg 
Orionastraea phillipsi 4.jpg 
Orionastraea phillipsi 5.jpg 

There's also a nice little bryozoan on the coral (down near the bottom centre in the first pic):
Orionastraea phillipsi + bryozoan.jpg 

Happy New Year everyone.

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TqB
Magnificent specimen, Curt, looks fresh from the sea!
Tarquin
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CurtKnap
Thanks Tarquin; I was very pleased with this one. As you know, it's rare to find Orionastraea at all, let alone with such a clean calicular surface.
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valh
Happy New Year, Curt!  Very good tamnasteroid!
Valerij
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valh
Happy New Year everyone!
Valerij
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CurtKnap
Happy New Year to you too, Valerij!
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