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Swanseatrilobite
Stumbled across these by pure accident in a large Carboniferous limestone block used as sea defence. These were found near Llanelli in South Wales. I think I see 3 trilobite pygidia but I’m not entirely sure? The scale is a standard size house key... it’s all I had on me at the time. Thanks. Click image for larger version - Name: 36B55425-C40D-418C-B677-EB93E15B8401.jpeg, Views: 123, Size: 2.99 MB
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nomadiclifeguide
I can see why you think that but I think its the debris of a smashed up bivalve in the shape of a trilobite.
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Elbert
Hello,  I think they are trilobites too; in the old sea defences here in Holland this rock is commonly used and trilobites are often found on it.
These trilobites resemble Philipsinella sp.

greetings, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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CurtKnap
I agree that there are trilobite pygidia amongst the brachiopod debris. Nice to see a group of them as they're not common.
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Brittle Star
Hi

There are brachiopods but you cannot miss the trilobites either. Well spotted.
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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nomadiclifeguide
I saw broken up bivaves assembles in the shape of trilobites. Schooled. I Will try harder next time! lol
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cinders
The trilobites are really great as they are not common in the Carboniferous. I wonder where the rock was quarried from?
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Swanseatrilobite
Thanks for all the input. I understand what you mean nomadiclifeguide brachiopods have tripped me up once or twice in Carboniferous rocks. I spent many days a long time ago looking for Carboniferous trilobites and these were found purely by accident. Interesting that these are also found in Holland too, I figured they were fairly rare. There are a fair few quarries around here so it’s hard to say with any certainty. Would love to know their original beds though.
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henryrb
yep, you cant miss the trilobites well spotted! [smile]
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Colton Sears
if these are trilobites and are the size indicated by the key you should find some complete speciemens  among them  as small trilos tend to stay in one piece better... well observed


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Bonjoy
Those are Paladin pygidium. Most likely from limestone of the Oystermouth formation, which is Brigantian in age. If you wanted to look for more there are exposures of this formation in Mumbles. Infact henry Woodwards old monograph on Carb Trilobites has a complete Paladin specimen described from 'Castle Mumbles' listed under the old defunct name Griffithides glaber.
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Swanseatrilobite
Very interesting stuff Bonjoy! Thanks for the detailed explanation.
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