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ThomasM
Thanks for that, I did suspect that it was something to do with the preservation. I know that commercial websites sometimes get ids wrong, I have noticed mistakes on their Gault fossils. I was simply trawling the internet to come up with any examples I could find with "colour banding" and posted it as something I found.
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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Phileas fossilis
Species: Basinotopus lamarcki
P8220311.jpg 
P822031.jpg 

P8220.jpg 
P82203.jpg 

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clypeus
That's amazing. Conservation of color is always a rarity!
Well done!

ITER IN PRAETERITUM
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ThomasM
That is spectacular Phileas, the patterning looks similar to the one on my Gault Clay claw.



Sorry for hijacking your thread but here is an example of a Jurassic echnoid Nucleolites with a stripy pattern on it (I know I have shown it before). It would be interesting to see other colour banded fossils.




YX1.JPG 

Circled:

YX2.jpg 

Thanks




Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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Phileas fossilis
Thanks guys. It's only a small area of pattern. There may be more hidden under the matrix but don't want to overprep it. Hijacking welcome! Gives me something extra to look at on a lazy day.
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flintband


Thomas----not sure that is colour banding. Surely, those are the ambulacra?
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ThomasM
I've studied it under the microscope and I'm fairly certain that it is colour banding on the test rather than the ambulacra, although it does seem to follow the lines of the ambulacra. Also this colour banding is only visible in some places, and not at all on the top of the test where the details of the ambulacra can be seen more clearly.
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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prep01

flintband wrote:


Thomas----not sure that is colour banding. Surely, those are the ambulacra?

I agree!
Colin Huller
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Phileas fossilis
Are we seeing differential accumulation of trace elements during mineralisation due to alignment of shell structures and consequential varying colour?
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spider
Preservation of colour doesnt happen often so well done Thumbs Up
Have a nice day :0)
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ThomasM
That'a what I think Phileas - in my echinoid it certainly can't be just the ambulacra preserved as suggested above as there is a colour difference in the structure of the test, most visible under the microscope. I think most colour preservation would be formed this way.
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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Olenus
Spectacular finds guys. Here are two bivalves showing colour banding from the Lower Carboniferous.
Pseudamusium ellipticum.

col1.jpg 

 

Aviculopecten planoradiatus.

col2.jpg 

 

Lee
The Ace of Spades,,,







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ThomasM
Those are great Olenus, where were they found? I remember reading somewhere that these types of colour banded bivalves are typical of a certain locality, I just can't remember where.

Thanks
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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Olenus
Hello Thomas, they are from the Castleton Reef belt in Derbyshire. I have also seen Gastropods and Brachiopods with colour banding from this area.
 

Lee
The Ace of Spades,,,







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ThomasM
Colin, if you look on a well known fossil site that sells British fossils and click on echinoids, you can see an example of a Jurassic regular echinoid with prominent colour banding - wish I could post a link to it but rules are rules...
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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ThomasM
Eh? Where's prep01's post gone (unless I imagined it somehow?)

Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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prep01
I had a 'senior moment' (54 on Friday) and deleted the reply - sorry!

I will have a look Thomas.
Colin Huller
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flintband


Thomas---- still think that these areas are the ambulacra, not colour banding. Worth noting that all Recent echinoids of a similar form to Nucleolites are off-white in colour and have no bright colours or bands. Echinoids of the Nucleolites/Cassidulus group are not really known for being very colourful,
unlike the really bright Coelopleurus.
If Nucleolites had colour bands when alive I think it very unlikely that the bands would follow the exact course of the ambulacra. Don't know of any echinoids, fossil or living which do this, except regulars.Also, can't help wondering what purpose colour bands might serve on the underside?
 
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ThomasM
Interesting points - here are a couple close up pictures of the test which I hope should clear this confusion up.

P1040070.JPG 

Through the microscope - sorry for the bad picture but you should be able to see the colour
difference.

P1040068.JPG 

Thanks



Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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flintband


Thomas-- I think the answer is probably that the test is thinner along the ambulacra, due to the numerous pores and therefore shows-up as a different shade of grey. Have looked at 40+ examples of this species and the "colour band" is present on all of them, to a greater or lesser degree.
       You also have to be careful what you accept as fact. The commercial website you hinted at is well known for being suspect on the specimen ID and locality, especially on the echinoids.
        For example. 259 is  Tylocidaris clavigera, 258 didn't come from there, 254 is not from Dumpton, 252 is not a "Cidarid" and the colour bands are an artifact of the preservation, 247 is not Micraster, 240 is all wrong-Bajocian at Upware- nonsense, 239 is the wrong species, 202 is decipiens, not coranguinum,and finally, if 185 really is decipiens, it certainly didn't come from Peacehaven, which is all lower campanian, pillula chalk.
        Similar problems occur on other web sites and even revered sources such as The E.D. are still full of errors. Welcome to the REAL WORLD of fossils!
 
 
 
 
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flintband


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