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Great stuff.... lets go dig up some roads
Lee
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dark
  ive got a fossil that i found a few years back that ive allways been amazed by and thought a bit special ,after getting nowhere online trying to find if there is any system to report fossils if you feel they may be important .  so i emailed a f,l,o (finds liaison officer from metal detecting my other hobby ) yesterday and asked if he knew anyone i could email some photos to and record if necessary, i had a reply today and kindly he has sent my email on to someone he hopes can help .
it strikes me as strange that with all the focus and laws on recording finds there is within  my hobby of metal detecting that do you think i could find anywhere to report fossils to online ? guess there not worth enough money to be of interest to powers that be . if anyone knows of anywhere id be grateful to know thanks .
 anyway heres some photos ,
  it i belive is a type of eurypterus ( sea scorpion ) and the only reference i can find to them from the bed i found them had a question mark next to it .




you can clearly see the big pair of pincers and a scaly body .   its 250 - 290 million years old.
will keep you posted on any outcome
you got to look to see
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dark
the fossil is about 3 inch across
you got to look to see
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rock kicker
Looks more fish than eurypterus to me (not that im an expert in this age of fossil!). I thought all eurypterids had plated bodies not scales. I have seen fish that have been preseved in an upright position with the pectorals sticking out from either side which resemble this.

Rock Kicker

find a rock, pick it up and all that day you'll have good luck
http://www.fossilmegastore.com
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AMARSH
I'm sure Wiccaman has something similar from Caithness - some kind of fish?
 

Andrew
Andrew Marsh
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dark
you could be right altho i have several of the known fish from here and the scales are nothing like this also nowhere like this size ??
this is what the fish look like

 

but thanks for the input like i said you may be right , i will let you know the outcome
you got to look to see
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TqB
I'm pretty sure it's a fish as well, nice specimen, looking forward to a proper ID.
Tarquin
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Gary W
I would say some sort of Placoderm fish. 
Gary
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dark
Gary W wrote:
I would say some sort of Placoderm fish. 



that would be great as there not known from the carb bed these came from in the sw
you got to look to see
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orcadian
Looks a little like Pterichthyodes milleri to me. Where's it from?
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dark

cornwall ,

you got to look to see
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moonmoth
very nice! def fishy :)

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wiccaman9
Hi there,
 

  Very Fishy indeed... I don't think it to be a eurypterid, there are very clear scales present...ie piscean, no dermal chitinous plates dorsally. The fish is squashed in a dorso-ventral position, the large 'eye' like structures are the opercular plates, covering the gills, the left eye socket being just visible, forward of the plate?. Fleshy pectoral appendages!! but heavily scaled again...   

 

    coelacanthoid?...

 

  Where did you find the fish? You say 290-250 MYA but then say you've collected from the 'Carb' beds...?

 

 250-290 MYA  is the Permian period, post Carboniferous, and the fishes to be expected are likely Palaeonisciformes, Acrolepsis and Platysoma types, Rhabdoderma types (Coelacanthids) and Elonicthyids, etc...?

 

 Could it be from the Bude beds???

 If so, then circa 316 MYA, Carboniferous (354-290MYA) - Possibly Cornuboniscus sp?

 

 Doesnt seem to be like the placoderms (Ptericthyodes milleri et al) I have in my Devonian collections, from Achanarras and Spittal flagstones....Placoderms are just that, flat sheets of bony plates over the head and thorax and then a relatively exposed scaled tail.

 

 Will be nice to see what the reaction is...I'll plump for a dorso-ventrally flattened 

  Cornuboniscus budensis... was going to say Rhabdoderma initially, but cannot see the giant scales about the head or the characteristic flame like patterns on the scaling that so defines them...

 

 Cheers,

 

 Aron
"I think I could turn and live with animals, they are so placid and self contained..."
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dark
hi yes i was lucky to be working on the roads in cornwall when they cut through a line of the  westphalian beds known to contain the fossils palaeoniscids cornuboniscus, elonichthys aitkieni an acathodian acanthodes wardi and a crustacean crangopsis huxley but have trouble placing the fossils i found . if any one can help that would be great Wink 
sorry about missakes in other post lookig at one thing typing another thanks for pointing out Smile


these are some of the better one ive got

 

  ive all ways thorught of as cornuboniscus




but no expert .

 

a shrimp ?



 

then theres this one ?


close up of skin


 

i like this one and would love to know what it is


closer


theres a sharp row of ?teeth?



thanks for all the help and input
you got to look to see
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Bill G
Hi Dark,
 

very nice but please only upload pic's with max dimensions of 650h x 500w pixels. If your pic's are on a host site, please copy them back to your computer and resize them before uploading.

 

Cheers.
Cheers, Bill
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Gary W
These are exceptionally rare, fantastic fossils.
Gary
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TqB
Indeed, beautiful material; Dark, I'd say you're right about the teeth.
Tarquin
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acutipuerilis
These are indeed truly staggering finds, and I'm sure there is scientifically important material in here. My best gues for the first one (remember it's always hard even from a good photo) is actually a cephalaspid - it reminds me of some of the best of the Herefordshire Devonian specimens. The shrimp is also extraordinary. The specimens appear to be in nodules - is that right? If so, it looks very like the preservation you get up in northern Scotland in the Devonian - which makes this site of yours a really major discovery.
 

Of course, it's your choice what happens to them, but I would urge you to ccontact some specialists in the groups concerned. I'll be happy to point you in the right directions if you're interested. There would be a lot of very happy people out there if these got formally described!
http://oldasthehills.proboards.com/index.cgi (For when you can't get enough trilobites, sponges, and squidgy blobs...)
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TqB
I think these might all be Carboniferous though, as Dark says. The Cornuboniscus looks convincing and shrimps like that are fairly common in some Upper Carboniferous nodule beds (never found one though!). Are these actually Bude Beds?
Tarquin
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dark
yes point away please . i would love to get them recorded if need be and conserved in the best possible way . post or pm me any details you think may head me in the right direction please ,
thanks loads   
you got to look to see
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wiccaman9
Thats what I was asking Tarquin,
 

 - Cornwall for fish fossils, palaeozoic deposits?? - Bude beds, ie Carb, end of, but discussion there re: age of rocks is a valid point, Permian age rocks described in terms of age of deposits and talk of Palaeoniscids, again Permian species... which is it? Carb or Permian

 

 If they are Bude fish beds, then likely Cornuboniscids?

 

 Of Darks' second set photos - the first scaled body imprint very like Staffordshire Coalfields' Elonichthys species, and the jaw at the bottom very similar again to Elonichthys species of the John Ward collection, I have similar Elonichthys jaws myself...same fine teeth and grainy deposits to the lateral aspects of the mandibular plates.

 

 Aron
"I think I could turn and live with animals, they are so placid and self contained..."
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dark
dark wrote:
hi yes i was lucky to be working on the roads in cornwall when they cut through a line of the  westphalian beds known to contain the fossils palaeoniscids cornuboniscus, elonichthys aitkieni an acathodian acanthodes wardi and a crustacean crangopsis huxley but have trouble placing the fossils i found . if any one can help that would be great Wink 
sorry about missakes in other post lookig at one thing typing another thanks for pointing out Smile


these are some of the better one ive got

 

  ive all ways thorught of as cornuboniscus




but no expert .

 

a shrimp ?



 

then theres this one ?


close up of skin


 

i like this one and would love to know what it is


closer


theres a sharp row of ?teeth?



thanks for all the help and input
you got to look to see
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dark
don't know how i managed to re post that Embarrassed
you got to look to see
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moonmoth
really nice interesting fossils dark, i like the shrimp :)

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Johnny
I'm green with envy. Well done on finding such exquisite fossils. Keep us updated if you get them formally identified!
J

Mud glorious mud.
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Gary W
I went to several localities near bude where these nodules are supposed to be found but didn't find anything!!
Gary
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dark
you wont mate , i lived there for 20 years and never found any from the coast Cry and i looked and looked , the cliffs never change never erode so nothing to find or even look through Cry i only got mine because of the road works that dug in to the beds , shame . makes me wonder what other locations are the same never eroding so no one ever knows what may be there  ??
you got to look to see
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dark


taken a while but i got a id reply on these fossils
 
 
 
you got to look to see
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danny1
Some  amazing  finds  there.
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