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gm8
Hi All, Newbie here.

found these at Charmouth a while ago. Any chance they might be something interesting? The larger one seems to have distinct line or break around the top. Any help would be much appreciated.

Thanks
G IMG_4257.jpg    IMG_4259.jpg  IMG_4260.jpg  IMG_4263.jpg  IMG_4264.jpg
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CurtKnap
Hi gm8 and welcome.

Not teeth, unfortunately, but worn belemnites, which are actually part of a squid-like creature. These are common fossils at Charmouth.

Try googling belemnite.

(the smallest thing in the first photo could possibly be tooth/bone in origin, but I can't see enough detail)
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gm8
Thanks for the info CurtKnap, much appreciated.

Gm8
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devonjem
The small thing in the first picture looks like a spine from an Eoderoceras ammonite- just a guess.
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TqB
Agree with both of those - the belemnite is actually quite a rare one, apparently a Coeloteuthis sp. (also known as Clastoteuthis which isn't currently officially valid though I believe it should be!).

The small one indeed looks like an Eteoderoceras spine.
Tarquin
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gm8
Fantastic info, thanks devonjem & TqB. I have googled all of those names and find it fascinating. Great forum.

G

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estwing
Is Eteoderoceras a synonym for Eoderoceras?
Or is one the subgenera of the other?
In which case, is it Eteoderoceras (Eoderoceras), or Eoderoceras (Eteoderoceras)?
Thanks for shedding some light on the subject...
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TqB
estwing wrote:
Is Eteoderoceras a synonym for Eoderoceras?
Or is one the subgenera of the other?
In which case, is it Eteoderoceras (Eoderoceras), or Eoderoceras (Eteoderoceras)?


The genus was revised in Murray Edmunds' 2009 Pal Soc monograph, A Revision of the Lower Jurassic Ammonite Genus Eoderoceras Spath and its Immediate Descendants and Other Relative 


( An excellent read if you're interested in ammonite evolution and resulting nomenclature.)
Eoderoceras is retained for the twin spined ones (E. bispinigerum being the type species). Eteoderoceras was erected for the unispinate forms such as E. armatum.

So this specimen could be from either but the unispinate forms are a lot more common!
 
Tarquin
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