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Figure Stone

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Hi, I am an amateur archeologist working in the field of prehistoric tools, art and figure stones.

Whilst searching for figure stones I quite often find fossils, sometimes modified into tools, of left as is (besides the ubiquitous application of red ochre and birch tar).

Here are some of my figurative flint tool finds with fossil inclusions:
Figure stones 123.jpg  figure stones 212.jpg 

Some of the fossils I find are quite straight forward to make a basic interpretation of: Theropod Claw.
P1030357.jpg
But often I am clueless as to the species, like this flint fossil partial jaw bone with two teeth:
P1030392.jpg 
  Or this flint fossil claw:
P1030372.jpg  Can these items be reliably identified?

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Brittle Star

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi and welcome.
Your bottom three photos only look like fossil claws and jaw, flint can take the shape of fossils but claws and teeth look very different, bone normally has a honeycombed look. Flint can include marine fossils such as crinoids and spaces where sponges were. Your top photo seems to show signs of a sponge. Others may be able to shed more light.

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Figure Stone

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Hi, thanks for the possible ID of the fossil in the flint pick (first photo), the second tool has what appears to be a diadora fossil,( Keyhole Limpet)

As for the two claws, the second has structure for the attachment of tendons, and the first is uncanny in shape and details to a theropod claw.

The fossil jawbone is exactly what it is, two worn/decayed molar like teeth are visible, I can provide more photos if required.
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TqB

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I think the fossil in no. 2 is an Isocrania, a well known Upper Cretaceous brachiopod that does look rather like a limpet.

I agree the apparent claws are typical flint nodules, probably formed along trace fossil burrows.





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Figure Stone

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P1030397.jpg 
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Figure Stone

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Reply with quote  #6 
Could be either with the brachiopod, they both make good candidates.

Diodora
diodora_crucifera.jpg 
Isocrania
Isorania_egnabergensis_external.jpg 
There is no one single reason why flint nodules shaped like bones or claws are not fossilized bones and claws, in fact probability would suggest that is exactly what they are.

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Figure Stone

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A close up of the fossil in the second flint tool. Diodora sea shell fossil.jpg 
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Figure Stone

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Your flint nodules are only vaguely shaped like a jawbone and claws and show none of the diagnostic features which would be expected.


Open your eyes man, It has two teeth.
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Brittle Star

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Reply with quote  #9 
If you are so convinced it is a jaw with teeth, please take it to a museum for identification.
Members on here have years of experience and would not mislead you.
I have not heard of a jaw and teeth being totally replaced with flint.

There is no need to be disrespectful to people giving you an honest answer. Whether you choose to believe what you are being told is up to you.

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ukgeltd

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Reply with quote  #10 
As per my reply to your email that you also sent us direct. We at UK Fossils completely agree with others on this board;

This does not look like, nor has any signs of being a fossil bone or jaw.

If you feel you are still not convinced then as per previous suggestions, please take it to a museum to confirm.

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Figure Stone

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Well sorry you feel that way, because it is a partial fossil jaw, period, no argument, just fact.
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Figure Stone

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Here is a flint fossil finger, if you look closely you can see the finger nail. Middle to upper chalk 92-71 million years old! Nice Isocrania sp by the way

finger.jpg 
I have one myself. so many people are brainwashed by mainstream 'science', Recommend  read, Cremo's book , Forbidden Archeology.

Here is another partial fossil jaw bone, found under tephra layers, last eruption was over 35MYA.

For those who are in the know, even the mental foraman is visable.



fossilized human mandible.jpg
  Fossilized human mandible piece.jpg 




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