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Stingle
Hello everyone, I’ve been spending time in Brighstone Bay this week which is known for dinosaur fossils.  I found this unusual rock - could it be a dinosaur fossil?  30059B11-ECDE-458D-9274-B393505C9E19.jpeg  E1BB7BD5-B5A4-4DCE-89E5-D4C4088424B0.jpeg 
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prep01
Sorry, this ithe flint cast of a burrow system
Colin Huller
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Stingle
Oh thank you for that info - where can I learn more about burrow systems? I am very interested to learn more! 
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Rolo
Yes a flint sadly. For dino bone look for heavy black or dark brown rocks which have no right to be the shape they are on a beach. It's easiest to spot when wet, the most distinctive feature being a honeycombe internal structure like the inside of a crunchie bar, filled with mineral inclusions. Most bones are fragmentary and beach worn but even very worn bones usually show some original bone surface.
When you learn to recognise Dino bone it really is unmistakable, there's nothing else quite like it....you'll know when you find a real piece. So if you are unsure it probably isn't.
Oh and ignore flints if you are bone hunting!
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Barrow Museum
A bit more information you asked for about the burrow systems:

You have picked up a nodule of Flint, which is a form of cryptocrystalline quartz and occurs naturally where chalk is the local bedrock.. Flint formed soon after deposition of the Chalk (around 80-90 million years ago), a metre or more below the sea-floor. The silica was derived mainly from the dissolved skeletal elements of hard sponges, in the generally alkaline environment that existed below the sea floor.. When organic matter rots, it sometimes can create local acidic conditions.  The silica can no longer remain in solution in these conditions and reprecipitates as a form of silica gel initially, while the chalk (calcium carbonate) dissolves instead. This process occurred preferentially in more permeable parts of the sediment, such as horizontal galleries of burrows (probably excavated by shrimps for feeding or shelter). Consequently, most flints are replacements of the chalk in and around burrows, and the shape of a flint nodule generally reflects the original burrow morphology. Yours is a piece of one of these "Nodular Flints", which has grown even bigger into quite a large irregular mass. Sometimes, they were so abundant that they coalesced into a more or less continuous bed, forming a so-called "Tabular Flint".
So, while this is not exactly the dinosaur you hoped for, it is the direct result of animal activity in the Cretaceous Period which has been preserved and is called a Trace Fossil.

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Stingle
Thank you so much for taking the time to explain this to me - I really appreciate it! 
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MartynH
Hi, I have attached a picture of a small piece of bone from Brighstone Bay so you can see the sort of colour and texture you need to be looking for. Most of the bones are black or very dark brown (although you can find white, red and I have seen a green bone) - it is worth popping into the Dinosaur isle Museum in Sandown, if you are on the Island,  so you can look and handle real dinosaur bones to give you a better idea of what to be looking for. Click image for larger version - Name: DSCF4404 (1).jpeg, Views: 31, Size: 230.91 KB
Martyn H
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Stingle
Thank you much for that!  It gives me a much better idea what to look for. The picture has such an unusual pattern/texture on the surface - is this typical? 
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Dirty Pete
Hi
That bone has been broken and the pattern exposed is the inner spongy (trabecular) bone. The outer surface normally has a layer of smooth (periosteal) bone.

Pete
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