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easterly
Hi, I wonder if members can help with what look like plant fossils in an East Runton rock?

Briefly, the rock shown below was found roughly half-way between East and West Runton, Norfolk. It is one of a number of distinctive orangey rocks towards the edge of a paramoudra and rock bed near the low water-mark. The rock is roughly 12 inches/30cms long, very hard, heavy and doesn't look like native Norfolk stuff.

As for the 'plants', the dark, bulb-like one on a stalk, second from left in the close-up pic, is roughly one inch/3cms across. I looked at other similar rocks but saw nothing that clearly looked like plant matter - although many had dark, curvy 'abstract' patterns that might suggest leaf-materiel - I couldn't make a judgement.

I have spent time on Google Images but failed to come up with anything very helpful. If any board members can offer some guidance over what's seen in the pics thanks in advance!

Easterly Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_5128.jpg, Views: 52, Size: 859.07 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_5365.jpg, Views: 50, Size: 678.18 KB
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Dirty Pete
Hi Easterly,
There does seem to be carbonised remains at the edges and they are rather plant/seaweed like. Maybe this bloke could help you, looks like a jolly chap.

https://www.northnorfolknews.co.uk/news/go-fossil-hunting-on-north-norfolk-coast-all-year-round-1-6525007

Pete
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LiamL
Hi, I'm not sure about the location or the colour of the rock.
The shapes remind me of belemnite cross sections. Not saying it is, just an observation.
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Dirty Pete
What I thought was carbonised edges seem on closer inspection to be dark flint and the 'stems' have white hairline cracks running the length of them. Maybe complex diagenetic alteration processes going on.

Pete
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Brittle Star
I would say not plants, would say voids filled in. Rock does not seem sedimentary. 
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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Dirty Pete
Reckon its varicoloured flint/chert.
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Barrow Museum
Just a thought (not being able to hold or test the specimen) but how about the item being a limestone cobble containing a few oncoids?

There is an illustration of something suspiciously similar (albeit from Dorset and called Snuff-Boxes) online: https://woostergeologists.scotblogs.wooster.edu/2016/07/01/woosters-fossils-of-the-week-iron-oxide-oncoids-snuff-boxes-from-the-middle-jurassic-of-southern-england/
Snuff Boxes.jpg 
I suppose that there could be a similar lithology offshore, brought to Norfolk with the Pleistocene ice sheet(s)
Try testing the pebble with acid to discover if it is limestone (if it reacts)..

 

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easterly
Thanks so much, everybody, it's helpful and informative to read your range of ideas.

Pete, thanks for the link, I will drop the guy an email. I noticed the fine line you spotted and don't know what to make of it.

Brittlestar, you're right about 'voids' the three...entities on the right are not 'filled in' - rather like the oncoids pic posted by Barrow Museum.

Barrow Museum, your suggestion of oncoids (of which I'd never heard) looks very plausible. I won't test the rock with acid - it's still on the beach. It's much heavier than any limestone I've handled - far too much to lug to a car and, anyway, I believe it's a SSSI.

Thanks again to you all!

Easterly
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easterly
I believe - and hope - I've just posted a message thanking everybody for the time and thoughts that went into replies...the page greyed-out and I'm not sure what happened!
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Bill G
Yes your post was successful 
Cheers, Bill
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