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maclou
Hi, I’m new to this site but I’m an avid beach-scourer & love nothing better than spending a few precious hours on the Suffolk coast! I collect sea-glass, stone-age implements & fossils.. I’ve found a fantastic piece of fossilised wood recently which I will post later & a few Echinoids (three in one day!!). I found this yesterday & think it could be part of an Echinoid?? I’m not an expert by any means but I enjoy reading about fossil finds & local geology; any information would be gratefully received!! Thanks 6BDB63B6-CE8C-41A1-935B-569B8E9FA0CD.jpeg  E765158F-F72F-4F25-A52D-716CCDF9F38B.jpeg  8567F639-786D-42AC-97B3-35A00605020C.jpeg  12023C43-ECA0-46FC-8C69-EA23B260FF82.jpeg  37AD59C6-B48F-4482-B48B-1790155FA360.jpeg  DCA58320-C076-43DE-B5A7-CC677F9A6CF7.jpeg 
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Barrow Museum
It's rather battered by being rolled around on the beach.  But it's obviously a piece of flint.  If it was a sea urchin, I would expect to see clearer evidence of the five-rayed symmetry.  As this is not really evident, I think you have a fossil sponge, but I hesitate to even guess a name.  It will be good to see photos of your other finds.
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maclou
Thanks for your expert opinion Cambrian Rockhound! Here are the echinoids I found around October last year.. I particularly like the heart-shaped Echinoid; it seems like a good specimen. The shell impressed in the piece of stone is tiny but perfectly formed! The shell fossil is approx 4mm x 4mm. They were found at the foot of a cliff (of Norwich Crag formation) at Easton Bavents. I will take some pictures of the fossilised wood tomorrow & post.  Click image for larger version - Name: CE5B2100-B798-498B-8DCE-CDEB76D0FC47.png, Views: 20, Size: 1.11 MB Click image for larger version - Name: F6A9C199-CC18-4526-B8BC-E16D0D655182.png, Views: 22, Size: 680.55 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 528AC80E-8EE2-4E96-93B0-4AE643F1E453.png, Views: 22, Size: 710.95 KB
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Barrow Museum
Thanks for posting these pictures.  Apart from your comment, there's no indication of scale and a ruler would be a useful addition in photos in future.  Nevertheless, I am familiar enough weith these fossils to beable to estimate their size and give you a classification.

The small shell is the impression of a Rhynchonellid brachiopod (my first fossil discovery some 60 years ago was very similar!)
The egg-shaped echinoid photo is rather indistinct, but is probably Echinocorys.  Additional shots from below and from the side would help to confirm in future.
The heart urchin is a classic Micraster.

Both sea urchins are internal casts of the test (shell), the flint having formed inside (and often around as well) the empty shell during early stages of burial in the Chalk sea some 80-90 million years ago.  Glacial activity brought them to where you found them.

You are far from the first person to have found these objects of interest.  They have been collected since pre-historic times and found in archaeological contexts (see: https://www.geolsoc.org.uk/Geoscientist/Archive/June-2012/Prehistoric-fossil-collectors ).  More recently, farmers would pick them up in their fields (in southern and eastern England) and place them on the doorstep in the belief that they would ward off evil spirts.
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