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steveshq
Last month at Whitby, whilst I had my head under boulders yanking out small vertebrae, my wife was splitting sandstones looking for some plant remains.... She found this one, amongst other stuff, yet despite looking everywhere to name this one, even a visit to the NHM in London could not show this species?

It does look very similar to the usual fern patterns you see, but the individual leaf does not have a central stem or mark at all?

We even photographed the positive side of the split to see the same marks in negative with no lines as a give away for identification.

Any ideas please, if not, I'm back up the NHM!

Cheers gang (sorry not too much scale but about 6 inches across and 10 inches high) Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20190826_192029.jpg, Views: 49, Size: 250.79 KB
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Barrow Museum
Not an expert, but consulting the literature suggests it is a member of the order of plants "Bennettitales", similar superficially to cycads, but in this case would have forked veins in the individual pinnules, rather than parallel ones as in Cycads.  It most closely resembles the genus Otozamites, but someone who knows these may well dispute this.  This order had quite large fruiting organs, resembling flowers (eg Williamsonia) and the whole lot became extinct in the Cretaceous.  Very good specimen by the way!  A very dilute coating of conservation grade consolidant would ensure it doesn't flake away.
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prep01
Hello Steve, looking at 'The Jurassic Flora of Yorkshire'(p80 text-fig28 A) and enlarging the photo, I am pretty certain that it's Zamites gigas. The alternating pinnules, slight curvature of them towards the tip and the slight swelling at the base I think make it a positive ID.
Colin Huller
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steveshq
Thanks very much to the both of you for the responses.

Colin, although I can see a resemblance it still doesn't seem 'Bang-on' to me. The only thing is the single leaf that tapers quite steadily, not rounded tapers like all the other specimens, including all the one's, I also googled after your very grateful identification.  As a gardener, identification of plants has been natural to me and I had originally assumed that the tapered leaf was one of a juvenile, a baby leaf etch.

But, again, and after countless image searching, I can't find another single specimen that has this taper and arrangement. Maybe it's two different species together in the sample?

I shall check out the book you mention Colin as this may short cut my own references, thank again.
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