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Bobo the bear
Found a few bivalves and normal Gryphaea but I found as always something unusual (for me) at this place.
The echinoid was staring up at me just off the path at Filey Brigg. Thank goodness it was wet...when dry you can hardly see any marks.
The other photo must be some type of Brachiopod - from the shape I think Antiquatonia?

Both Carboniferous?

IMG_20181127_164135972.jpg  IMG_20181127_164150341_BURST000_COVER.jpg  IMG_20181127_164217356.jpg
Bobothebear
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Bobo the bear
On second thoughts I think the echinoid is Micraster sp. So will be cretaceous, probably washed over from Flamborough/Speeton
Bobothebear
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prep01
Not Micraster! I need a profile pictures and another one of the underside without the puddle please. Is it in flint?
Colin Huller
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Bobo the bear
prep01 wrote:
Not Micraster! I need a profile pictures and another one of the underside without the puddle please. Is it in flint?


Hi Colin,
at a guess I would say shale but there are shiny highlights at different angles in the light. It does feel quite heavy for its size and doesn't fizz when a drop of acid placed on it .
Another pix of underside and profile pix as requested. I thought Micraster cos I saw the indentation in one of its sides (a worn heart shape maybe).

IMG_20181127_212024683[1].jpg 
IMG_20181127_212110224[1].jpg  IMG_20181127_212156295[1].jpg  IMG_20181127_212219816[1].jpg 


Bobothebear
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CurtKnap
I'm not an echinoid expert, but the size and form remind me of Nucleolites sp. (examples of which I have from several UK Jurassic locations).
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prep01
Hello Robert, I'm afraid I don't know the area, and without it 'in the hand' it's going to be more Q's & A's! you say it doesn't react to acid, but it is 'heavy for it's size' This would say 'flint' to me - will it scratch with a steel object? What is the path made of (bedrock, gravel, combination of....)? I'm afraid your new photos are not suitable to enlarge to see detail, and I don't see the indentation of an 'evolved' heart urchin. It does look to be similar to a Nucleolites sp. but this is a Jurassic genus and would not be in flint.
Colin Huller
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Bobo the bear
prep01 wrote:
Hello Robert, I'm afraid I don't know the area, and without it 'in the hand' it's going to be more Q's & A's! you say it doesn't react to acid, but it is 'heavy for it's size' This would say 'flint' to me - will it scratch with a steel object? What is the path made of (bedrock, gravel, combination of....)? I'm afraid your new photos are not suitable to enlarge to see detail, and I don't see the indentation of an 'evolved' heart urchin. It does look to be similar to a Nucleolites sp. but this is a Jurassic genus and would not be in flint.


Hi Colin,
yes it does give fine whitish powder when scraped which Does give off CO2 in acid.
I found the echinoid on top of the Birdsall Calcareous grit bed actually on the Brigg which is of course Jurassic (Oxfordian) and very hard!
Bobothebear
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prep01
Thanks - Nucleolites then.
Colin Huller
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Bobo the bear
Thanks for info guys. Much appreciated.
I still think the other find is a Brachiopod but cannot be later than Permian most likely carboniferous. I have other carboniferous erratics from Filey. I think most Brachs died out end of Permian extinction event.
Bobothebear
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TqB
I agree that looks like an erratic Carboniferous brachiopod - a productid of some sort, maybe Echinoconchus judging from the ornament but Antiquatonia is possible too and probably loads of others. [smile]
(Productids and many other brachiopods didn't make it past the Permian extinction but enough terebratulids and rhynchonellids survived for them to re-radiate and be common in the Mesozoic.)
Tarquin
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