GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
Buckthorne James

Found this in London clay area. In railway cutting where there was a pond before canal was built in 1809 and still a reed bed today.
it weighs 800 gram - was wondering if could be petrified wood? 

this is where it was found 

https://www.fourthreserve.org.uk

delighted to find your forum
thanks
James 583D40AF-1AB8-46B1-88BF-F973DBE08A53.jpeg  74E22276-4942-4D9B-86E3-4B7B7272FAC1.jpeg  C121CFDF-A7B6-4C70-AF76-FD317EB37F62.jpeg  F757688A-783F-4487-B0C6-E39F2239CD44.jpeg  0C4382FB-1F99-4094-974B-C3362C9E0682.jpeg  12B447A7-FEBF-419E-89C4-1E8BB81B3FE4.jpeg 

Quote 0 0
Dirty Pete
Hi James,
Seems to have a high organic content but I'd probably describe it as a shaley, iron rich, carbonaceous mudstone. 

Pete
Quote 0 0
prep01
Hello James and welcome to the forum. I cannot be sure without having the specimen 'in my hand' but I would say this is recent compressed mud with organic matter. Looksa like a nice place.
Colin Huller
Quote 0 0
Buckthorne James
Hi thanks for your thoughts - it is feels heavy for its size - nearly 2lbs.

James 
Quote 0 0
Buckthorne James


The following was written in 1805 and describes the exact place where the stone was found (ie where the old pond was) - hope this context is useful. Do you know what lupus helmantii would have referred to in 1805?


Shortly after passing this cottage the ground begins to rise up towards Brockley Green and the first thing observable in the newly cut banks is a very curious stratum of a yard thick or more consisting entirely of small bivalve shells and long slender screw shells these are in very good preservation but the greater part of them are broken Most of the whole bivalves have the two shells adhering together and closed Some thin veins of these broken shells exhibit a beautiful example of the process of nature in the formation of limestone and several lumps and although no harder than gingerbread have the appearance and fructure of compact shelly lime stone so exactly that in a cabinet where it could be seen but not touched it might deceive almost every one in thinking it to be real stone For eighty or one hundred yards further the banks of the canal are almost entirely formed of these shells and through which as well as the stratum itself the water will hereafter leak in large quantities if this part of the canal is not most carefully lined with puddle In ascending the hill it appears that a stratum of reddish coarse sand of several feet thick crops out above these shells then a clay of considerable thickness is seen and then a slight spring of mineral water very highly charged with iron as appears by ochry deposit this was apprehended to proceed from a layer of ludus helmantii but owing to an old pond through which the canal has been here dug and which has so completely slipped in the truth of this could not be ascertained This old pond had a considerable thickness of peat formed in its bottom and the same was observed in another old pond in the clay a few yards higher up the hill but there was no appearance of ochry water Above this clay is a stratum of very fine clay with the appearance and fructure when dry of Fuller's earth but abounding with minute and shining specks of mica

Thanks
Quote 0 0
Buckthorne James
I am now wondering if it is a lump of old iron - it looks and feels very similar to the rusted piece of metal in the photos below, found nearby. Click image for larger version - Name: A6964662-0F3F-446D-8FB4-FDD8A23FB238.jpeg, Views: 14, Size: 567.64 KB Click image for larger version - Name: CCEA3A23-FE9A-4EA5-9C09-C929105A5181.jpeg, Views: 14, Size: 348.89 KB
Quote 1 0
Dirty Pete
Break it up and see if there's any unoxidized iron and try it with a magnet.

Ludus Helmantii I'm pretty sure are clay balls. Stiff clay lumps falling into a river then rolled along the river bed forming spherical masses then deposited is one theory.
Quote 0 0
Chris G
Almost certainly iron with that look and weight for the size.A lot of the rust won't be the original object. When you find heavily rusted horse shoes they are about twice as thick as when made.
Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us