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Gooker
Hi I know this looks like a random piece of flint
DSC03300.jpg  the other side
DSC03301.jpg  it does sit comfortably to hand [this should give an idea of scale]
DSC03308.jpg  DSC03305.jpg  is it just my imagination or does it show signs of "human" handiwork in the indent [mostly from one side] ?
DSC03302.jpg  DSC03303.jpg  DSC03304.jpg 
this was picked up last week on Huttoft beach Lincolnshire which i understand has been replenished from north sea dredging.

I have been a long time "lurker" on this forum and would be grateful if the kind and knowledgeable folks here could give me the benefit of their experience. [smile].  
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Dirty Pete
Maybe this might help

http://leicsfieldworkers.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/flint_id_guide.pdf

Pete
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Gooker
Thanks SP
The flints on that site look much more sophisticated than my very crude specimen but as they are local i may contact them.

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prep01
Hello and welcome to the forum. Sorry to say  - it.s natural! Keep hunting!
Colin Huller
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tc
I was at Tidmoor Point, Dorset back in the spring. There wasn't much to be found in the way of fossils except for a few small Kosmoceras and more tiny belemites than you could shake a stick at but I did turn this up. FleetBlade.jpg 
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prep01
Hi tc, I have tweaked one of your photos and in my opinion it is 'debitage' (Debitage is all the material produced during the process of lithic reduction and the production of chipped stone tools. This assemblage includes, but is not limited to, different kinds of lithic flakes and lithic blades, shatter and production debris, and production rejects.)
Colin Huller
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Gooker
Hi Colin
thanks for the reply
tbh the flint didnt look man made to me but it had the right sort of shape for a notched scraper [to my untrained eye] but it felt comfortable in my hand and the way the inside curve of the flint had chipped was enough to at least ask for a second opinion before consigning it to the "non recyclables" LOL

i have been reading this forum for a few years now and it is always interesting and the depth of knowledge here is impressive.

Paul
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tc
Hi Colin.

Thanks for the info, very useful. When I first saw the tip of the flake sticking out of the mud I thought at first it might be a shark's tooth but of course once I had it in my hand it was clearly man-made.

I very much doubt  it is possible to date my find but I'll ask anyway...  😉
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prep01
Yes - 75 - 80 million years old!
Colin Huller
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tc
I see what you did there [wink]
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Weald on Bed
tc - judging by the size, and the hint of retouching along the edge, I'd say it's most likely Mesolithic - so roughly 10k to 5k years old. Difficult to be 100% though as the use of microliths did continue into the later stone age in some areas (probably depending on local availability of decent quality flint resources.)
The tell-tale signs of human manufacture are the clear percussion bulb at the top right of the right hand pic, from which the concentric ripples develop. The left hand pic also shows that other flakes had been struck from the outer parts of the same core before this particular flake was knapped off.

The apparent retouching seen on Gooker's flint is just the result of being rolled around on the shore by the waves. In such situations, existing sharp edges are naturally more likely to suffer damage - which can look very like deliberate retouching. One useful clue is that recent damage can have very different patination from older fractures, which I think is the case with your "human handiwork in the indent"
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Gooker
Thanks for the additional info W on B.
Fossils have long been an interest of mine though i,m no expert but i know almost nothing about stone tools so its all a learning curve for me.
I think I will label it as a "pseudo scraper" and keep it as an example of what not to pick up in future [smile].
I do have a couple of flint urchins i have found over the years and the first fossil i found with my father was a flint with a small shell in it we picked up while gardening when i was just a young kid in the early 60s. 

Paul [gooker]

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