GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
Lord of the Grunt
Hi everyone.

Just thought I would post about some Urchins that i found in the gault clay last time I visited Folkestone.

i believe the one with the spines is a Alloma Rhodani, please correct me if I am wrong. If anyone could ID the other I would be thankful.

I will also attach the Compass location taken off my IPhone, in case anyone would like to look themselves as the area was very rich in fossils.

Off to Folkestone again tomorrow for the weekend. If you see me on the rocks feel free to come say hi.

image1.jpeg

image2.jpeg


image0.jpeg A4D9F310-144B-4B42-8CA6-813779E20C2F.jpeg  EE7083BF-AB43-4C65-AC70-E368EDA3A003.jpeg  D7FB643A-BE3E-47B1-8F7C-CE0BC88D6FC6.jpeg  92ABB710-3ACB-4EAB-A7A7-D1F900BF3EE4.jpeg  794AF26F-B9A1-4093-8248-3579D56A082E.jpeg 
Quote 0 0
Gary W
I think the 'other one' is Hemiaster, the regular echinoid with spines is very rare, good find.
Gary
Quote 0 0
Lord of the Grunt
Thanks for the info Gary. I was very happy to find them. Got more today but didn’t find any with spines this time.
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
The first one is Pliotoxaster asterias

That Alloma is is absolutely unbelievable, can't overstate its rarity enough. That's the only one I have ever seen found in recent years, myself in over ten years collecting at Folkestone have found only a few disarticulated spines. There are a few specimens in museums. Amazing find.
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
Lord of the Grunt
Thanks for the ID Thomas.

Got to find a way to preserve it then! I was going to do a spray clear varnish. But willing to take any advice on how to preserve it. The Gault clay is terribly fragile.
Quote 0 0
LarryS
Nice find!
You don't stop playing when you get old, you get old when you stop playing
Quote 0 0
MartynH
Hi, I would not use spray varnish on the urchin (which is quite exceptional by the way) I would probably try Paraloid as that coating can be reversed where varnish is a nightmare and will yellow over time. Might be worth sending a message to the NHM asking for their advice as they have some excellent preparators who have worked on similar material in the past and could give some good advice. In the short term I would certainly control the rate of drying by keeping the specimen in a plastic bag as the drying process can sometimes destroy the fossil if it happens too quickly. Good luck with the preservation.
Martyn H
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Yep some excellent advice from Martyn. If it hasn't already dried completely paraloid the surface then plastic bag it (leave small holes to allow moisture to escape slowly). You said it was found a while ago so may have already dried out - keep any bits that have flaked off. Don't varnish or use PVA. Don't apply water. Keep it dry with some silica gel as it looks like the middle is composed of porous pyrite which tends to be pretty unstable.

Can't stress enough the importance of this specimen. It is semi unique. Looks pretty well stratified as well - it is clearly from Bed II, the intermedius subzone. If you are looking to get it prepared, this material is my speciality and I have extensive experience with similar specimens.
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us