GuidesMagazineShopBuy FossilsJoin Hunts
AMARSH Show full post »
ThomasM
I would love to go tomorrow, but, being part of a family, I can't go all the time. Do let us know how you get on though.
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
ThomasM

Hi all,



I have been doing a bit of prep work on the Homolopsis, I managed to
reattach the bit on the right which was stuck to the counterpart. Still got a bit to prep out on the top right of the carapace but it isn't coming off as well as I thought it would so will have to leave that in the meantime.

It now looks like this.

P1040253_-_Copy_-_Copy.JPG 

Detail. Before anyone asks, the two small fragments missing from the carapace were lost on site.

P1040253_-_Copy_3.JPG 


I also found this on the counterpart, it looks like a small crab, only 2 or 3 mm across, possibly a juvenile Necrocarcinus? Or something? ID help needed please, this is actually the negative as it shows more detail than the positive, even though it doesn't look like it in the picture.

P1040269_-_Copy.JPG 

Any ideas welcome,





Edited by ThomasM 2011-09-01 13:41:34
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
schming2001
Wow, this is a crabby piece! Do you think that last one could be Necrocarcinus?
I got one good piece the other day. A Hamites maximus from bed vii. It was hard to get it out in one piece but it's not too bad. I've put a smaller but better preserved specimen above, which I collected a few years ago.

Cheers, Joe

 

 Big_hamites.JPG 
Fossils are great.
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
I think it may be a small Necrocarcinus, failing that a bit from another crustacean. It's certainly one of the most interesting crab pieces I've picked up from there.



That H. maximus is spectacular, very nice, I've not collected one that good myself. Here's a similar one that's on display in the NHM.

P1040071_-_Copy.JPG 


Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
Naze Dave
Quality stuff, Thomas is that the claw of the Homolopsis in the top right?
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Unfortunately I think that bit is just a random bit of shell, only rarely are the claws associated on Gault crabs.

Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
ThomasM

Been going through some clay from the Upper Gault. Here are two forams - one on the left is Citharina recta and the other I don't know, any ideas Joe?

P1040374_-_Copy_-_Copy.JPG 

Thanks






Edited by ThomasM 2011-09-02 20:51:09
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
schming2001
Nodsaria something I think!
Fossils are great.
Quote 0 0
schming2001
I'll check in my book and let you know...
That NHM Hamites is a beaut. One day maybe!
Fossils are great.
Quote 0 0
ThomasM

Thanks Joe, it could be Nodosaria, although it doesn't have the ridges running down its length unlike all the other Nodosaria I have.



Here are a few ostracods from the same sample. (sorry for the rather poor photo, my microscope wasn't letting me take good photos today)



Top Cythereis reticulata.

Middle Homocythere harrisiana.

Bottom Cytherelloidea chapmani.

P1040376_-_Copy_-_Copy1.JPG 

Thanks




Edited by ThomasM 2011-09-03 09:01:58
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Been sieving again. Got a few fishy bits. In the picture there is a jaw, vertebrae and tooth of a fish.

P1040381_-_Copy.JPG 

Thanks


Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
mudbug2


Thomas
Nice clear pictures well done, how much magnification are you using?
 
Regards to all who, share the passion Mudbug...
S.H.T-N
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Sorry mudbug, should have said, it's 20X

Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
Naze Dave
Cool, always interesting to see the results of screening clay.
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
Quote 0 0
schming2001
I'm pretty sure it's Lagena sp. A genus with plenty of species, a number of which look like yours.

from The foraminifera of the Gault Clay of Folkestone - Chapman

Hope this helps!

Enjoy your sieving!
Fossils are great.
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Thanks for that Joe, I need to get Chapman's monograph! I've heard it's good but rather outdated - needs a revision I think.

Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
schming2001

That'd be a lovely PhD project eh?!

Fossils are great.
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Hi Joe,

I'd actually be more interested in creating a guide to the Folkestone forams, and microfossils in general, as such monographs as the one mentioned above are hard for the amateur to get hold of, and I think this discourages the collecting the microfossils. Something that is easy to read, like Fred Clouter's book, only for microfossils. It will of course have to wait a long while, as I've only just scraped the tip of the iceberg in terms of collecting Gault microfossils, but in the future I think it will be a fun project. I don't think that I would ever know enough about forams to actually revise them though.

Just out of interest what was your PhD on, Joe, microfossil related I assume?

Cheers


Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
Phileas fossilis
Hi Thomas

Im going to sheppey on saturday for Fred's fossil day at the gatehouse museum. Bringing a few of my finds to add to Freds webpage. Im sure he would be keen to expand the microfossils section!

Top effort with the sieving! Too much like hard work for me.

Phil


Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Hi Phil,

How often are the fossil days? As I would love to be able to go but can't make it this Saturday, will there be another one any time soon?


Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
Phileas fossilis
Hi Thomas

I dont know how often the sheppey one is. At the museums in Canterbury we run a big annual Fossil Roadshow with the various local fossil groups attending. This is to be held in the summer next year. It used to be held in Janurary or February. 

Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Thanks Phil. Do you know if the Maidstone Museum Roadshow is on this year?

Thanks


Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
Fred
The Minster gate house fossil day is only annual held in September. The Maidstone Museum roadshow is now an event of the past as they have effectively sacked Dr Ed their natural history curator. The natural history department is being run by collections managers and volunteers.
A complete cock up in the making I'm afraid.

So short sighted.

Fred
Quote 0 0
schming2001
I did my own book on the microfossils of Folkestone Thomas. Just an amateur one but it was fun anyway! PM me your email address and I'll send it on over for you to have a look at.
I was going to do a PhD looking at the Quaternary history of the River Stour but while on a dig at a primary school in Essex with my would be second supervisor, I found out that kids can be fun to work with and so I became a primary school teacher instead - just gone back for my third year of teaching and still loving it.

Cheers, Joe
Fossils are great.
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Thanks Fred for the information, sad about the Maidstone Museum though. I heard that they have a great collection. Are you putting on a display at the Canterbury show next year with the MFMS?

Thanks Joe, I'll PM you soon when I need it (the sieving is slowing down as I'm busy catalogueing).

Thanks

Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
schming2001
And you can borrow Chapman by all means Thomas,
Joe
Fossils are great.
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Another update. I've had the bryozoan back on page 1 identified by Dr Paul Taylor as Spinicharixa dimorpha. This is a fairly common species in the Gault (common is relative, as bryozoans are rare anyway). He said it was a nice big specimen.

I also got to have a look at the Gault bryozoans at the NHM. They actually have surprisingly few specimens from Folkestone, most were from Leighton Buzzard or Burwell. I think they really could benefit from further research - next time I visit Folkestone I am actually going to try and specifically look for bryozoans.

Here it is, cleaned up a bit.

P1030557_-_Copy.JPG 

An interesting feature of this specimen is that the shell also has limpet grazing traces on it, small marks left by the radulae of certain algal grazing limpets.

Two close up pictures - the scratches are he grazing traces, whereas the dark blobs are the bryozoan zooids.

Bryozoan_limpet_grazing_2_-_Copy_2.JPG 

Bryozoan_limpet_grazing_1_-_Copy.JPG 

Thanks



Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
Naze Dave
Hi Thomas,
Very interesting pics, thanks for sharing. How do they know it was a limpet? Surely it could have been any grazing gastropod?
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Something to do with the structure of the marks I think, I've got a paper on this subject that I'll dig out tomorrow.

Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
Naze Dave
Theres a paper on it? Obviously these scientists have too much time on there hands lol, just kidding.
Thanks
Dave
Still Life
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Here's the link - should explain most of it.

http://palaeontology.palass-pubs.org/pdf/Vol 25/Pages 361-367.pdf


Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
spider
Thomas, Great closeup photos of the fish remains and very intresting to see the feeding traces Thumbs Up
Have a nice day :0)
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Something a bit different.

Fish otolith found yesterday, in sieved residue from Bed III, the D. niobe subzone. Probably Pterothrissius galtinus.

Length 3mm.

P1040726_-_Copy.JPG 
Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
ThomasM
Thanks Andrew. This is my first nice one, although I have half of another one somewhere.

Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
Quote 0 0
Write a reply...


Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2019 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us