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keithlittle
Hi Richard, Not really, i just remember seeing them from time to time on this forum.
 


 

Happy searching.

 

Cheers

Keith
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marinefly


Hi, I'm new to the forum and wondered if anyone could give me any pointers as to what this is?
 
 
 
I found it on the foreshore near Lee on Solent when walking back to the car after fishing.  It's about 60mm long and I was wondering if it's some sort of fossil or just a natural stone/pebble?
 
Any help appreciated.
 
Cheers Dave
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Richard
Hi 

It looks like a flint.

If so, its shape suggests that it formed inside a crustacean burrow in the sea floor chalk.

If so, it is a trace fossil known as Thalassinoides.

Sorry for all the ifs but its not easy to tell from a photo!
Richard
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rab7ies
hi,yep its flint.
down amongst the stones.
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marinefly
Hi, thanks for the replies.  Forgive me for sounding thick, but I thought flints were grey/black inside. 
 

 

Picture deleted as it was too big and already id'd. Please stick to a max of 650w x 500h pixels, as per pic' posting directions.
Edited by Bill G 2011-06-29 19:10:56
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rab7ies
hi,flint can be several different colours(please dont ask me why as dont know! lol) i find alot of flint fossils and its usually orangey-brown or white flint i find them in.
down amongst the stones.
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marinefly


And there's me thinking I may have found a fossilised tooth  
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rab7ies
ha..weve all done that!
down amongst the stones.
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Richard
Hi Marinefly

When a flint loses water, it takes on a blue colour and then, as more water is lost, a white colour. 

Also, flint absorbs minerals from the surroundings e.g. iron will produce a brown / red colour, and glauconite a green colour. 

Also, heated flint turns red.

Etc. etc. 

I have never heard of a tooth preserved in flint but someone on here may know otherwise.


Richard
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rab7ies
top info! i wanted to know why too!!
down amongst the stones.
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ThomasM
Richard - see this link, with Gary W's fish in flint... if bone can be preserved this way in flint I would suspect teeth could be as well but this would of course be a very rare occurence.

http://www.discussfossils.com/display_topic_threads.asp?ForumID=13&TopicID=2271&ReturnPage=&PagePosition=45&ThreadPage=1


Thomas

If you don't look, you won't find.
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keithlittle
I have seen quite a few examples of shark teeth in flint (from Europe) also a reptile tooth was recently posted on the steinkern forum, but i have never found any yet.
 

Cheers

  
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Richard
Thomas = thanks for that reference - Gary W's fish in flint is a great find.

It reminded me that I have read an account of the preservation of the teleost Dercetis  in flint.  the fossil included a few teeth. However this type of preservation is extremely rare and was as external moulds rather than casts. 

Keith - do you have any reference for the sharks' teeth in flint, I would like to have a look at them? 


Richard
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P King Chef
Hi Richard/ Keith,

to view the forum "Kreide" (chalk) where the above mentioned reptile tooth in flint is posted you have to be a member of Steinkern.


Pete

At work I have to make a lot of sacrifices.
It's one of the benefits of being a Druid.
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