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ryjocl93
Thanks for your reply Ruth, here is one.. sorry it isn't totally clear

14.JPG 
http://ryanclarkphotography.blogspot.com/
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ryjocl93
I foolishly brought these fossils ages ago so don't have much information on them, can you help Identify them and give me any information you can as i'm still a bit of a novice.

1. This fossil came from Dover, i believe it is a cretaceous brachiopod but don't know any more than that. It is 1cm. can anyone give me some more information?
DSC00002_2.JPG 

2. This i believe is a sea urchin, it is 3cm across but i don't know any more than that. can anyone give me some more information?
 DSC00025.JPG 

3. These i think are brachipods, the matrix is 6cm. But i don't know any more than that. can anyone give me some more information?
 DSC00026.JPG 

4. These bivalve imprint i was told was glacial erratic but i dont know any more than that. can anyone give me some more information?
DSC00089.JPG 

5.This sponge is from the wentlock quarry and is 5.5cm, can anyone give me some more information?
 DSC00077.JPG 

Thanks, i realise that its hard to ID things without more information so thanks for your time.
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Richard
Hi

1 Bivalve - oyster type
2 Need clearer photo 
3 Bivalve perhaps Gryphaea
4 Bivalve pectenid type
5 Coral (Silurian) Favosites
Richard
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TqB
Can't quite tell from that angle but I think no. 1 is a rhynchonellid brachiopod.
 

I agree with Richard on the others.

 
Tarquin
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Richard
Hi again

Having looked at Fossils of the Chalk, I think Tarquin may be correct about number 1.

It is very similar to the brachiopod Terebrirostra.

Problem is this is given as from Devon Wiltshire and Dorset.

Someone will know for sure.
Richard
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ryjocl93
There are some more photos of the first fossil, it may help distinguish between the two, if not then thankyou anyway as you have been a great help. I was told it was from Dover but didnt collect it myself so they may have passed on the wrong informationDSC00001.JPG 

DSC00003.JPG 
DSC00009.JPG 

Here is a slightly clearer picture of the second one:

DSC00011.JPG 

Thanks ever so much for you help so far
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prep01
The shell in chalk is (I assume), one half of a brachiopod of the group (FAMILY) ELLERELLIDAE.Without a) having it in the hand and b) knowing a lot more about it - that's as far as I can really go I'm afraid.
Colin Huller
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Phileas fossilis
The key to identifying if something is a brachiopod is. Brachiopods have two different shells. If you cut the two shells in half down the middle you end up with two symmetrical sides. Most bivalves have two symmetrical shells. Hope that helps.

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TqB
Colin - you missed off the "W" - Wellerellidae! - but I agree, rhynchonellid anyway.
Tarquin
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prep01
Sorry Tarquin - I really MUST read before posting posts I was going to say "rhynchonellidae", but wasn't sure if it is a 'sub-family' or what and Fossils of The Chalk just had the 'family' name.
I have read through this!
Colin Huller
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TqB
 "Rhynchonellidae" is a separate family but I presume both families are in the order "Rhynchonellida" (assuming that still exists - I'm using Clarkson, Invertebrate Palaeontology and Evolution but it doesn't go down to family level, need the Treatise) - brachiopod classification is a mite confusingConfused.
Tarquin
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prep01
Tarquin,
"I'm using Clarkson, Invertebrate...."
I'm CONFUSED!!!!!!!
"need the Treatise" Me to!!!!!!!!!!
Colin Huller
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ryjocl93
Thank you. So could someone summarise what we know about it as i am also very confused :)

Anyone know any more about any of the other fossils?

Thanks :D
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Red1973
Can you take a pic of the urchin from on top looking down please. It may help identify it.
Thanks. Ruth
Geology rocks!
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