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sd41
I just wanted to add, that 'Wave' is completely right about the rapid rate of deterioration of fossils and footprints/casts, once exposed to the elements.

 I visited Fairlight last summer and spotted an absolutely STUNNING example (museum worthy) of a large theropod footprint. I took photos on my first visit but unfortunately did not have my camera with me on the following visit... a mistake I shall not repeat!

The destruction from nature was very evident. Within a space of just 4 weeks, there was moss covering the ruts made from the toe impressions and details such as the claw indentations were less defined.

If only it wasn't too large!!!!!

sd41
Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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sd41
Hi everyone,

I'm a newbie here who would GREATLY appreciate any opinions on these finds from Hastings and Pett Level- Cliff End region.

Large dinosaur footprint, Iguanodon? Hastings
IMG_8507.JPG heel impression from large dinosaur?
Ankylosaur/Stegosaur ( if possible in UK?) footprint?IMG_8510.JPG Small Theropod footprint... I'm so hoping!? Approx 7 by 7 cm, loose nodule, sandstone? Found on foreshore at Cliff End/Pett Level. My theory is that it is from a raptor of some sort that walked on front toes in soft mud to make the deep impression? Hope it is the real deal as it is sitting on my bookcase as a prized showpiece and my true first major find????? Not totally certain what it is but I'm totally in love with it. I'm filled with the thrill of the unknown and possibility of what it may be. So mysterious and exciting!:)IMG_8531.JPG 

Any in sight on images would be more than welcome. I wish to learn.

Many thanks and good luck to you all on your future hunts.

sd41 :)


Edited by Bill G 2014-07-08 10:06:45
Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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sd41
Hi all, I've just posted this message but would like to change the topic title to, Fossil ID-footprints at Hastings. I can't figure out how to do it... any tips?

Thanks 

sd41
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Bill G

Done
Cheers, Bill
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sd41
Many thanks for editing the topic title Bill G. I hate modern technology but love this Forum. Any opinions on my last photo?

Cheers again

sd41
Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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PaleoStu
The third print does look like theropod based on the length of the middle digit; it looks like nodes (the pads on the toes) are visible too.

The second print is far more interesting (to me at least). This looks like a possible thyreophoran manus print and looks very well preserved. It could well come from and ankylosaur - what age are the beds it originated from?

Did you collect it? I'm working on both British dinosaur footprints and ankylosaurs and would be interested in a closer look at some point.
I love VP. I love whelks.
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sd41
Hi PaleoStu,
many thanks for the feedback, its much appreciated as I'm a VERY amateur fossil hunter who is eager to learn lots more. This forum is fab! I'm annoyed with myself for not joining earlier. I am a real technophobe and hate computers, I'm only just getting to grips with posts and attaching photos etc. However the thirst for more dino knowledge has encouraged me to research on the web... and face my computer fears.

 Regarding the images, the gorgeous 4 toed footprint, found at Hastings, is located not too far from the landslide site that occurred in Jan 2014 (can be seen on Youtube, just type in, Hastings cliff collapse) It was absolutely huge! I have nothing in shot to help gage its size, I'M AN AMATEUR, realised when I got home my mistake!!!!  Anyway, it is at least 2 ft wide, and obviously remains in situ. Far too big for an Ankylosaur, a dino fossil hunter contact has suggested to me, if bigger than 18" a Sauropod. I myself am in the middle of researching to try and determine exactly what dinosaur it came from... wish me luck. I so wish I could have it in my garden, it was absolutely stunning to see and a real thrill to come across. But at the end of the day I guess its best left in situ for others to enjoy. Sadly I can't take all the credit for finding it, my hubby spotted it first... damn. :) 

I'm obviously fired up after seeing these beauties and very keen to get back to Hastings to hopefully find the footprints again to correctly record their locations and measurements etc. I will try to get back at the end of the month, if possible as I'm resident in London. If I do ( no, I shall be more optimistic) When I come across it again, I will surely forward on the details to you.

I have on good authority been told that the age of the beds are 140 mya- Lower Cretaceous. In your opinion do you think it may be a relevant find? If so, what to do next, contact museums, if so who, any suggestions?

sd41 
p.s don't you just love my cute little theropod footprint in the nodule. My first major find... I'm so proud of it! 

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sd41
Hello PaleoStu, 
 first of,  apologises if there are x3 different versions of this message sent out on the forum to you? Each time I have tried to send a reply post my server had gone down on me - bad connection/bad weather,  and I'm not sure if they have been sent?

Can I just say that I am in awe, i am not worthy!

I have just had a nosy at your blog (PaleoIllustrata), what wonderful work you do! So exciting!

I myself truly regret not persuing a vocation in my childhood passion of dinosaurs or utilising my natural talent within fine art, some say I have a wasted talent ( excuse the lack of modesty .) But my question is, why does an artist never recognise their own talent but others do?  I have always been very good at being self critical!  Anyway my itch for fossil hunting has come back with a vengeance. I hope to someday contribute to the world of paleontology, albeit it at an amateur level.

I have also checked your forum posts and can see that you have mentioned PM. As a self confessed technophobe and obviously not up to scratch with computer lingo, what do you mean by the term, check my PMs? I love dinosaurs but technology wise I AM one! I'm having to force myself to embrace modtech for the lust of learning dino facts.

Anyway, like yourself, I am fascinated with the Ankylosaur ( having just purchased a vertebra top from aa seller but unfortunately not finding my own, or any dino bone for that matter) one of my childhood favourites, along with the obligatory T Rex, Steg and Triceratops. But not to forget the beautifully formed Dimetrodon (there is a fabulous exhibit at the New York NHM.) I nearly peed myself when I saw it. I yelled out pretty loudly with excitement in front of many stony faced tourists. What great, fun memories. :)

Be rest a shored that I will keep you updated on the 4 toed footprint following my next visit to Hastings. Hopefully I will be able to locate its exact position again and measure it accurately.

sd41 
Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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sd41
Hi PaleoStu,

I forgot to include this in the last post... sorry.
Regarding the age of bed, I have been advised by a very knowledgeable contact that Hastings beds formations are from 140 mya - Wealden supergroup of Sussex, Early Cretaceous Epoch. Hope this is helpful? But just to clarify that the matrix was very rose/red toned, is this from a different age?

sd41
Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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PaleoStu
Hi SD41,

Apologies, I misread your post and thought the size was much smaller. As you say this is way too big for an ankylosaur and a sauropod manus sounds very likely. Good on you for leaving it in situ for others to enjoy too; I study the tracks on the Isle of Wight and we do loose them to collectors occasionally even in protected areas, which is a shame.

Thanks for the kind words, but really I'm just an amateur as well and a digger at heart, as most of us are. I'm pretty lucky to have got the opportunities to study but if I can do it anyone can, believe me. Also, never underestimate the role amateurs play in our science; without them many specimens might be lost to natural processes or disappear into private collections, both of which mean they never get studied.

PMs =  person mails, which are accessed by the icon in the top left bar at the top of the page.

I really need to get down to Hastings at some point to check the area out for myself.
I love VP. I love whelks.
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sd41
Hi PaleoStu,
Again thanks for your input on the footprint and the PM details. I looked at the top left bar near the Members Control Panel but  there is nothing there, no icon? 

Anyway, cheers and all the very best for your research, good luck with the PhD.

sd41
Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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prep01
sd41 - you may need to wait until you have more post/replies before you can use the Private Messenger facility!
Colin Huller
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sd41
Hi prep01, cheers for that PM info. It makes sense. I will just have to post LOTS more! That's not difficult as I have so many questions that need answering... I'm eager to learn from you all.

sd41 :)
Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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sd41
Hi prep01, you was right. I now have access to PMs. :)
Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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prep01
That make things easier Stacey! And please call me Colin! (or anything else within reason) !!!!
Colin Huller
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sd41
Colin it is then. 

Well Colin, I'm off to Seatown in Dorset at the end of the month so I will be posting pictures of all my finds, as I will surely be returning with the latest complete Ichthyosaur and the largest ever ammonite. Ha... I wished!

Cheers Stacey
Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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jim211
PaleoStu wrote:
Hi SD41,

Apologies, I misread your post and thought the size was much smaller. As you say this is way too big for an ankylosaur and a sauropod manus sounds very likely. Good on you for leaving it in situ for others to enjoy too; I study the tracks on the Isle of Wight and we do loose them to collectors occasionally even in protected areas, which is a shame.

Thanks for the kind words, but really I'm just an amateur as well and a digger at heart, as most of us are. I'm pretty lucky to have got the opportunities to study but if I can do it anyone can, believe me. Also, never underestimate the role amateurs play in our science; without them many specimens might be lost to natural processes or disappear into private collections, both of which mean they never get studied.

PMs =  person mails, which are accessed by the icon in the top left bar at the top of the page.

I really need to get down to Hastings at some point to check the area out for myself.

Hello.  Just for the record, i helped Stacey with a possible ID of the print above being Sauropod. Also, i don't understand your feelings of sadness regarding collection of loose dino footprints/casts, as surely it is better for them to be salvaged from impending destruction by the elements !? Regardless of where they end up, whether appreciated by a person or people. Its a nonsensical POV to me, and i tell you, its sad when i have seen footprints and casts,where i collect, that have been intact one day, only to be broken by elements or people walking on them the next visit maybe just weeks later. Thus this vindicates what i do. Im glad i collect and save them.
Viva Hastings Beds
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Wave
jim211 wrote:
Hello.  Just for the record, i helped Stacey with a possible ID of the print above being Sauropod. Also, i don't understand your feelings of sadness regarding collection of loose dino footprints/casts, as surely it is better for them to be salvaged from impending destruction by the elements !? Regardless of where they end up, whether appreciated by a person or people. Its a nonsensical POV to me, and i tell you, its sad when i have seen footprints and casts,where i collect, that have been intact one day, only to be broken by elements or people walking on them the next visit maybe just weeks later. Thus this vindicates what i do. Im glad i collect and save them.

 
Why would PaleaoStu criticise responsible collectors? We are responsible collectors. No, I think he was talking about important material that goes missing, is never reported and never sees the light of day again.
 
Indeed, in terms of saving specimens for future generations, we follow by example the likes of Mary Anning and Gideon Mantell, and no one can argue with that. These people were the first in making concerted efforts to save these wonderful things. Many collectors, including ourselves, have been inspired by their hard work.
 
It is true that most collectors who read this forum choose to follow in the footsteps of the first great pioneer collectors Anning and Mantell.
 
You make a very good point about the loose footcasts. I don't think people realise, the speed of erosion can be alarming! Unless you have the proper permission to do otherwise, I would encourage only the collecting of fossils from non-restricted collecting areas.
 
Cheers
It's all in the hunt... share the passion
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sd41
Hi all,

I'M NOT GREAT AT COMPUTERS AND I CAN'T FIGURE OUT HOW TO PUT MY PIC BACK ON FOR REFERENCE, SO PLEASE LOOK AT THE IMAGES FROM MY ORIGINAL POST UNDER THIS TOPIC. 

I've been researching hard trying to find a suitable contender for my small theropod footprint (that measures 6cm in length) the one featured in my original post (the first post within this topic: Fossil ID-footprints at Hastings). I mean the 4th and last photo showing the loose sandstone nodule that I found on the foreshore at Cliff End/Pett Level, (Hastings Beds).

Could it be a Compsognathus? Some books I have date this dino as Late Jurassic, and the location that I found my footprint is Cretaceous, I believe??????...Please do correct me if I am wrong. 
And if a Compsognathus is not a possibility, than what is?

Opinions would be really appreciated... I'm itching to solve this sweet little mysterious find of mine. I would really love a name to go with it.

Cheers
sd41
Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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Wave

Sorry, sd41, some lovely photos there of dinosaur footprints. Fantastic looking sauropod footprint.
 
Incidently, there are hundreds and hundreds of footprints I have seen here in situ including long theropod and ankylosaur trackways. More than a lifetimes studies worth!! 10  or 20 or maybe a 100 lifetimes study. We all know loose footprints can be destroyed by the sea within months or weeks even subsequent to them being uncovered, at best the largest footprints are being eroded slowly. Jim, I shall continue to collect loose ones from this locality, just as many collectors have done before me and continue to do. True Jim, it makes no sense leaving them there to be claimed by the sea and never seen again. The IOW and several other localities are a different case, there have been restrictions placed on collecting them, and responsible collectors respect this.
 
Leave them there? Eventually to be destroyed by the sea. I really don't see this as a valid argument. Sure some, but still only very few, will be able to enjoy them before they get washed away for good. Then why not apply that same argument to the collecting of Marine reptiles in Dorset or dinosaur bones lying on the beach on the IOW or anywhere? No, because it's completely nonsensical. We should be saving them before they disappear forever. If they aren't collected, they won't be enjoyed by anyone.
It's all in the hunt... share the passion
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sd41
All I can say to that comment is... EXACTLY!

It simply comes down to (responsible fossil hunting):  retrieve=preservation, leave=destruction.

sd41


Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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