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Lozzer
Hello All,

I've found a fossil on the beach of the Suffolk Coast at Aldebrough.

It is a hollow, smooth, polished, heavy, white object. About 173g, 15cm long and 3cm to 6cm diameter (thinnest and widest points, respectively). I'm not sure if it is fully mineralised, but the majority of it seems to be and is quite lustrous in patches. It certainly feels like a rock.

I assume its a shin of a north sea mammal, howevre any ID's or other ideas would be welcomed! What I really can't figure out though is a small, angled hole (around 1mm) that goes straight through one of the sides. It does appear to be perfectly straight, sharp and cylindrical at a very low angle. It was quite difficult to take pictures of as my camera is not very advanced. I can't tell if this is a pre-death feature from an injury or if it has been damaged, eaten or worked afterwards.

The curves haven't come out very well in the pictures, but as a bonus there is also a nice tooth I picked up from the River Wharfe near Otley.

The pictures are below; any help with either of these would be very much appreciated!

Many thanks,

Loz

DSC_0333.jpg  DSC_0334.jpg  DSC_0335.jpg  DSC_0336.jpg  DSC_0337.jpg  DSC_0338.jpg  DSC_0340.jpg  DSC_0341.jpg 
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prep01
Hello and welcome to the forum. Your bone doesn't look fossilised but it could be, but I have no idea what it's from. The tooth needs separate photos in natural light.
Colin Huller
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Lozzer
Hello Colin, thank you for your reply.

I have taken a few more photographs of the tooth in some white light, unfortunately I won't be able to photograph it in the daylight until the weekend. Hope these help!

DSC_0342.jpg  DSC_0343.jpg  DSC_0344.jpg  DSC_0346.jpg 

As far as the bone shaped object goes, I really can't tell if it is a rock or bone. Some parts of it seem to be more rock-like, but others seem more brittle. The overall weight and 'cold' feel of it makes me think it has at least partly been modified, though.

Could you tell me how much of a difference it makes that the bone is hollow (tubular)? Does that make much of a difference on its potential history?

Many thanks,

Loz
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Weald on Bed
The hole in the long bone is what's called a 'nutrient foramen', where the blood vessels pass through to the interior. All long bones have one.
No idea what sort of bone though. Could be ice age, could be recent marine mammal or could be Victorian butcher's waste; all are found on East Anglian coasts.
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prep01
Hello Loz and welcome to the forum. As for the bone, I agree with Weald on Bed. As for you 'tooth', took a long hard look at it last night and realised what it is - not a tooth! Before I reveal all, may I remind people the importance of a) taking photos in good (natural if possible diffused light, b) adding a scale (a ruler is best) appropriatly places in all photos (from all aspects) and finally c) as much information of location, etc as you can. Anyway, as I said, I have worked it out! It's part of a belemite  which is very water worn and a section has broken off along its length. The darker cone shape is the start of the  phragmacone. within the alveolus.grooves.jpg
Colin Huller
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Dirty Pete
I'm struggling to see a belemnite so I'll suggest horse tooth.

Pete
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Bill G
as am I Pete but not sure of sp of tooth
Cheers, Bill
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Julian123
Modern bone and ice age horse tooth.
Julian

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prep01
Thanks Julian123, I think the londitudanally broken tooth confused me!
Colin Huller
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