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Serena
Found this in my garden in lowestoft. Looks like a planter? But interested in the crinoid looking surface? But could this just be concrete? Any thoughts? 

Thanks 
Serena  Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200831_152600.jpg, Views: 40, Size: 548.17 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200831_152606.jpg, Views: 39, Size: 490.97 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200831_152617.jpg, Views: 34, Size: 368.14 KB
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Barrow Museum
Looks like you have found a rather attractive natural stone garden ornament, packed, as you already have worked out, with Palaeozoic crinoid debris. I'd guess it is made of Carboniferous Limestone.  Test it with a little acid (dilute HCl or white vinegar) for a reaction to prove to your satisfaction it's limestone.
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Narlgoth
Very pretty, it would look great in our garden if you don't want it! 😜
- Brad
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prep01
Great find! I agree with BM.
Colin Huller
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Gary W
Very nice , definitely carved from Carboniferous crinoidial limestone.
There is a spectacular fountain at Chatsworth carved from similar rock.
Gary
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Serena
Hi everyone,

Great news. Thanks. I had only every spotted this kind of fossil on the Gower (Wales). So, was a bit surprised to find when digging in my back garden (east coast). Is this type of fossil common all over the UK? Or do you think it originated from somewhere else? Could potentially be linked to my garden backing onto an old graveyard? 

Thanks again everyone for confirming, I'll try to clean it up to show the designs on the sides IMG_20200831_152145.jpg IMG_20200831_152145.jpg  

Serena 
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Gary W
It doesnt come from anywhere near where you live, it has been mined elsewhere, carved and brought there.
Very difficult to say where the original rock was dug as Carboniferous, Crinoidial Limestone can be found in many places.
Eg Peak District, Yorkshire Dales, Lancashire Somerset, and several other places.

I presume some previous owner of your house brought it there as an ornament and for some reason decided to dispose of it by burying it.

It is a very nice ornamental urn and would be very difficult to obtain nowdays.

(by the way you posted your reply several times )
Gary
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prep01
Don't forget Wales (N & S) Gary!
Colin Huller
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Dirty Pete
Is the church associated with the graveyard still there or has it been demolished in which case could it be the font? The bowl seems too deep for a birdbath and a deep bowl of fetid water wouldn't make a very nice graveyard/garden ornament and surely not just a glorified flowerpot............just a thought.

Pete

PS.. Don't break it, this baptismal font went for nearly £4k.....

font.jpg 
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Serena
Hi everyone, 

Sorry for the duplicated reply. I didn't want you to think I was being rude and not responding. But, couldn't see the post when i submitted it. I've tried to delete the duplicates nows. 

I'll try to look after it. The graveyard is still in use (Kirkley cemetery). I really cant work out what it could have been used for, as you say Pete, it's slightly too deep for a bird bowl or graveyard ornament. 

Thanks again everyone. Any thoughts on what's best to clean it up with? Just soap and water? Might bring it indoors, 

Serena 
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Serena
Dirty Pete - there are small locked up churches (or some kind of worship facilities) still on the grounds. The picture you posted looks very similar to fossil bowl thing! Too late in terms of not breaking it... It has three large cracks which look as though they were repaired in a rush unfortunately. I'll bring it inside and will give it a good clean down. Any recommendations on what to use to clean it? Or better to leave as is? 
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Serena
Here's a few more pics. The sides look pretty rough compared to the top and inside the bowl. You can see the huge crack and rough repair  Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200903_153556.jpg, Views: 20, Size: 333.82 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200903_153608.jpg, Views: 19, Size: 534.08 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_20200903_153625.jpg, Views: 18, Size: 344.85 KB
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Dirty Pete
Have a go with a stiff brush + soap and water. The overall design and bowl shape/depth certainly fits with a church baptismal font. I remember as a kid in the 60's some churches being abandoned and left to decay before being demolished and turned into housing estates.

Pete  
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Chris G
Great find. I would do some history research on the church. Some symbols were smashed in times gone by and it would take a bit of a whack to smash that. 
As a font it could be much older than you imagine.
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Serena
Hi Chris, 

I tried to find a contact for the attached church but it's not currently in use (boarded up). And the only contact appears to be the Waveney Council. I'll keep digging, any thoughts on other sources to contact? 

The Cemetary which my garden backs onto is Kirkley Cemetary, Lowestoft. 

Thanks, 

Serena 
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Chris G
Hi Serena,

not really my area but I would start with https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1119709
Is it a church or a chapel. There's a small cemetery at the lychgate end circa 1884 with two mortuary chapels; one for CofE and one for non-conformist. The cemetery expands over time and is surrounded by allotment gardens in the 1920's. To get back any further I think you would need the county archives - it's always interesting to dip a toe in to local history. It may tell you when it was borded up and whether all of the contents were taken out. Yours is definitely a font https://www.englishsalvage.co.uk/fonts_itemcat_2028
You could drop this lot a line and they may be able to help more https://www.nationalchurchestrust.org/what-see-inside/font

Good luck,

Chris
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