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Hofling
Hi all,

I friend of mine found this while we were Metal detecting in Lincolnshire, near Tealby - in a field .

It is not metal but gives a faint signal with the detector.

Not sure if it is a fossil, looks similar to plant, like a bark, but could it also be bone?

Thank you for any insights, and have a nice weekend!

Christian. 20200215_124851.jpg  20200215_125116.jpg 
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Dirty Pete
Hi Christian,
Has it got a slight curve in profile? I've got a feeling it might be a short section of badly preserved ammonite. The groove is where an inner whorl would have slotted. I think you're on the Jurassic up there.

Pete.
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Hofling
Hi Pete,

thank you for your reply. I am not completely sure, I'll ask my friend, because he sent the pictures.

Cheers,

Christian.
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Elbert
Hello, looking at the shape and structure I suspect it to be a fossilized tree (palm?) wich has a high iron content due to the way it has fossilized.

greets, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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Hofling
Hi Bert,

thank you for your impression.

Christian.
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prep01
Hello Chritian, some more photos would be nice - especially the end on from both ends and the profile. To confirm Pete's statement it is Jurassic (Kimmeridgeian) but there can also be 'Till' which are a covering of sands / gravels left by melting glaciers, so fossils being 'derived' from other bedrocks!
Colin Huller
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Hofling
Hi All,

thanks for all the reply. My friend John is grateful for your opinion. He sent a couple more photos, showing that there is no curvature and a close up of one of the
sides. Here is what he wrote:
Thanks so much for that, Christian. Really good of you and please pass on my thanks to your forum ::g

I've added a couple of closeups showing the section and side view. As you can see, there's no curvature along its length and the section shows what looks decidedly like end grain to me.


Christian.

  section.jpg  side.jpg 
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prep01
Hi again Christian, it can be difficult without having a specimen 'in your hand' and not knowing the origin of it - I assume it was picked up from a 'surface'  rather than a 'formation'. so, going on, I have examined the new photos and I am coming to the conclusion that it is note a fossil but a slightly battered, ploughed and worn nodule of stone. Nature is very good at sending us enigmas like this and they are sometimes called 'pseudofossils'! Flint is THE worst (or best) at this!!!

OOOOOPS - just seen the word 'field ' in your original post!
Colin Huller
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Dirty Pete
Those latest two pics make me think ironstone (oolitic?), the second pic seems to have a 'wood fibre texture'. The Claxby Ironstone formation is not far from Tealby but not sure if it's known for fossil wood. I'm leaning towards Elbert's theory.

Pete.
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Hofling
Hi everyone,

thank you all for all the posts. I know it is difficult, but that was helpful anyway.

Good evening everyone!


Christian.
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