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RC
Hello
IMG_4686.jpg IMG_4695.jpg IMG_4696.jpg 
I found this small piece of rock on the beach this morning. Having tried to do some online searching, nothing clear, but a very strong suggestion of skin of snake / crocodile / other reptile - has raised pattern. Found on south coast beach near Warsash, Hampshire.

Photos strangely do not do the fossil justice.

If this fossilised reptile skin of some form - does anyone know how common this is to find?

Thanks
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Brittle Star
Hello

I am afraid it is not fossilied reptile skin. Probably a water worn pebble. Sorry
JW

 Never ask a star fish for directions
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prep01
As JW says, not skin - the broken face looks crystalline  either Quartz or Calcite - can you scratch and leave a slight groove with a steel poimt (a clcite mineral) or does the object just leave a greyish line (Silicate)?


Colin Huller
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RC
Hello
Thank you both very much for your comments. 
I've tried scratching one of the segments, and I can't leave a groove at all, it leaves a grey / silver line on top of the surface.
The segments appear more of a 'reptilian design', rather than water worn or plant formation, but probably that's because I can look at it at a number of angles
Is there any point in trying to provide a clearer photo or 2?

I have collected a range of fossils from this beach over the years, and collected some wonderfully different shaped stones etc, but never seen anything like this before

thank you
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Dirty Pete
Agate can take on that habit, known as snakeskin agate.

agate0610130002.jpg 

Pete.
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prep01
Iam sure it is a Silicate crystal.
Colin Huller
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RC
Thank you very much for this
Much appreciated
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Weald on Bed
Looks more like part of an eroded echinoderm test (fossilised sea urchin shell) to me. 
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prep01
Hello Stuart, RC says
"I've tried scratching one of the segments, and I can't leave a groove at all, it leaves a grey / silver line on top of the surface"
Therefore it is harder than Calcite, so almost certainly a Silicate.
Colin Huller
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