GuidesMagazineToolsFossilsHunts
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Simon Darby

Neogene Newbie
Registered:
Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi all,

When digging the garden for a pond back in the mid 80's I found the following about 3 feet below the surface.  We were talking about this at work so I thought I'd dig it out and thought I'd find a forum that could identify it. IMG_0489.jpg  IMG_0490.jpg  IMG_0491.jpg 

Your help is much appreciated!

Simon.

0
prep01

Avatar / Picture

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 2,885
Reply with quote  #2 
Hello Simon and welcome to the forum. Firstly can you tell what it is made from? My impression is that t's man made -but it looks very gritty? I think it is an unfnnished Roman lamp. The shape and sze are about right, as is the hollowed out centre but there is no hole in the 'spout' for a wick. I don't think it's a fossil.
__________________
Colin Huller
0
Dirty Pete

Avatar / Picture

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 740
Reply with quote  #3 
I can see faint concentric rings so reckon it's a sandstone concretion where the central core has contracted more than the surrounding material. 

Pete.
0
Weald on Bed

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 28
Reply with quote  #4 
Like Dirty Pete says, it's a sandstone concretion or nodule. Hertfordshire does have areas of sandstone, amongst the chalk and London Clay beds, so it makes sense in terms of the local geology. Definitely not man-made!

Imagine an oval-shaped ball of hard sandstone that formed over a very long time around a softer core. At some point it's has cracked in half to show the concentric rings and the softer core which has partly worn away.  

If you look up 'Concretion' on Wikipedia you'll find a good explanation of how such objects are formed - and some examples of the wacky & misleading shapes that can result.
0
prep01

Avatar / Picture

Cambrian Rockhound
Registered:
Posts: 2,885
Reply with quote  #5 
I agree that there is sandstone nodules in the Boulder clay, but this looks worked to me - St Albans museum or Herts Archaeological Society would be the next step.
__________________
Colin Huller
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.



Discussions on fossils, fossil hunting, rocks, locations, and identifying your finds.
(C)opyright 2018 - UKGE Ltd and UK Fossils - Contact us