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Martinosorous
an anyone identify this it is around 4"wide by 7"long I did not want to disturb it as too fragile
Kilve fossil .jpg
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Elbert
Hello, looks like the shell of a nautilus; if it is 3D preserved it is worth carefully digging up and taking out.

greets, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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Barrow Museum
You have not provided any scale or locality...is the photo 4x7" or does this relate to the object?
All I would hazard is to tell you I think you have 2 objects here.  The circular one is a transverse section through a sea urchin (probably a regular one).  I doubt that the lightly striated buried fragment below it is connected in any way.  It reminds me of a Gault Clay bivalve but I won't get in deeper by suggesting which one as so little is exposed.
Give us some more information and I am sure someone will come up with a better diagnosis.
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Dirty Pete
The photo file name is Kilve fossil.jpg which would make it Lower Lias presumably.

I'm thinking some kind of Gryphaea (dilatata?) shell, (upside down, filled with mud and the umbo exposed at the bottom.)

Pete.
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prep01
Hello and welcome to the forum. Firstly, posting in 'Your Finds' might have been a better option and please add a scale (a ruler is best) and as much information as possible. Having said all that and in this case, from what we can see, I agree with Pete that this is one valve of a bivalve shell, possibly Gryphaea dilatata or similar. I appreciate that as you put it a 'casual' fossil hunter but to make an informed ID we do need as much information as possible - please don't let this put you off from asking for help in the future.
Colin Huller
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Martinosorous
Many thanks, I did not go fossil hunting intentionally that day, and don't normally carry a ruler around with me! It was found at Kilve and the notices ask visitors not to dig fossils out of the rocks.
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cephalopod fan
Hi Martinosorous,
Your fossil is the 'vertical cross-sectional' view of a nautilid shell Cenoceras, Given the location and lithology, it's probably Cenoceras intermedium (Sowerby, 1816). What some have said could be a bivalve or sea-urchin is a cross-section through the body chamber / aperture of the nautilid! The lower part of the fossil shows the distinctive external ornamentation of the Cenoceras shell.

These are very difficult to extract and almost invariably break - the shell is quite fragile, especially around the body chamber. Kilve beach and cliffs are part of a SSSI and as you quite rightly say, the notices ask visitors not to hammer fossils out of the rocks but just to collect from loose material. There are usually plenty of loose boulders and cobbles available at Kilve for fossil enthusiasts to play with! Best wishes.
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Dirty Pete
Glad you cleared that one up CF, those 'longitudinal striae' were freaking me out. New word I learned from this paper:

https://docplayer.net/74563744-Fossil-nautiloids-from-the-upper-lias-toarcian-junction-bed-of-the-ilminster-area-somerset.html

Pete
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