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nomadiclifeguide
Has anyone else noticed how poorly labelled specimens are in many museums these days? In Gloucester nothing is labelled correctly. This fish was labelled "fish preserved in jet".
Who are these curators? 
20200106_160526.jpg 
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Elbert
Hello, I do agree with your observation; and this is not just in  the UK; all over Europe in practically every museum or exibition I visit  I find incorrect names or periods with the specimens.
On the other hand it must be very difficult to have it right all the time with every piece...it is the work of humans...
This fish I had already noticed on the net and it looks as if the scales have been made of jet, but the person that made this description did probably not realise that it is an impossability because the origine of  jet is a tree...

greets, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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nomadiclifeguide
Exactly my point. This is a very interesting specimen but any visitor would leave thinking that a fish can be preserved in jet. Thought these places were supposed to be educational.  Can't beat being self educated if tou ask me.
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cinders
I can sympathise with your frustration in seeing a wrongly labelled display specimen. I too would find it annoying.

However, I do know that Gloucester Museum has been without a geologist for many years, and I suspect that the displays may have been created using information on original labels from old specimens. Often, even if there is a geologist in post, they will not have the specialist knowledge to re-identify most specimens any more than the most basic information. Sadly, local museum and even national museums have been severely hit by funding cuts over the last few decades and geological curators are a dying breed. Many museum authorities would rather spend money on posts such as 'diversity officers', or 'public engagement', or whatever, rather than curators of any specialism. Thus the collections are effectively moth-balled until a well meaning but un-knowledgeable 'exhibition manager' or 'learning officer' rummages around to find something pretty to replenish their display which is starting to look dated because all the previous labels have too many Latin names and stratigraphical details on. 
I think the best way to approach such errors is to find the visitors book within the museum or gallery, and nicely point out the correction, possibly mentioning any resource books that could be used to help, or even offering to meet up with their 'curator' and show them the specimen/s, and talk it through. Many local collectors and amateur geologists have incredible knowledge of 'their' patch and it's a shame that more museums do not realise the potential of such people, eg. as volunteers to help curate, identify or interpret their displays or collections.

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JayBee
I agree wholly with cinders as a volunteer in a small museum with a good geological section and (fortunately) a good curator who is a geologist. It is difficult to find volunteers with specialist knowledge, but do your bit by (gently ) pointing out any problems - or why not volunteer yourself !. I felt a little awkward pointing out the pyrite rot at Sidmouth Museum, but it was well received and may save some specimens. Many museums are also swamped with the extensive paperwork needed to achieve and maintain accreditation and obtain funding.
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Elbert
Hello, I know there is an impressive amount of knowledge available on  this forum; so why not drill into this array and put your questions forward on this forum?
It`s free...

greets, Bert
the search is as valuable as the finds...
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