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Cokkie
Hi,

A bit late but thanks.

Geetings Walter
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Cokkie
Hello,

I found this, I think, Hamites but I can't identify it. It is quite large. About 17 cm. It is found near Wissant in the clay beds.

Greetings Walterhamites.JPG 

IMG_0840.JPG 
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schming2001

I'm not sure of the species but well done for saving it. It looks like it must have been a difficult job with the fragmentary nature of the clay!
Fossils are great.
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AMARSH
Agreed, stunning find! I love these heteromorphs, and in my experience complete ones aren't that easy to come by, so well done.
Andrew Marsh
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schming2001
Do you think that it would be worth reverse-prepping it to reveal its unworn side?
Fossils are great.
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Cokkie
Hello,

Thank you for the positive responses.  Even though it is only clay, I thought it was worth saving. The back side will be worse. So, I will leave it this way. 

I'm still hoping someone can identify it!

Thank you, Walter
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Cokkie
Hello,

I'm sorry to see that I have posted it in the wrong place. It, of course, should have been posted at the European Fossils place. But I was thinking about the Gault-clay in Folkestone.

Greetings Walter
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aurelius
I think more people would see it here, anyway.
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andy333
It may also be an Anisoceras sp. Nice find.
Crossing the eyes and dotting the teas.
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Cokkie
Hello,

Anisoceras sp. is more propable then Hamites, thank you for the hint.

Greetings Walter
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albianphil
well done, it is not easy to dig this out of the clay without breaking; Anisoceras or Idohamites.  The difference is that Anisoceras has small lateral turbercles on some ribs and Idohamites only ventral and not on the ribs
Philippe
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