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jim211
Brightonboneking, the pterosaur teeth i find are thinner, with light striations and a slight curve. Ornithocheirid is the one often found here. 
Viva Hastings Beds
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BBK
Hi....I hope you don't mind another Id request

I've tried to take the photos as clearly as possible, but understand they're pretty blurry.

It's just over 1cm long. I wondered at first if it could be somethings claw. As seemed to have a groove running down slightly from the top. Thanks again


201553072120_image15.jpg 201553072150_image15.jpg 201553072221_image15.jpg 201553072355_image15.jpg 
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sd41
Hi BBK,

yes it could very well be from a small Pterosaur, at slightly over 1cm... possible Dimorphodon?????

However, while looking online I came across this- Xiphactinus audax ( a Cretacecous fish)... going in a  totally different direction here I know, but what to do think?

Identifying teeth, the different possibilities are endless... have fun with it and let your imagination run wild!!!!!!
sd41



Edited by sd41 2015-05-30 10:00:47
Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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BBK
Thanks for the ideas there sd41. Although I prefer the pterosaur option, that looks quite a formidable fish!
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deltapodus
Formidable and ugly. While I can see it could be pterosaur, it can't be Dimorphodon - that's an early JUrassic genus. What's the age of the beds in the Hastings area? If I remember right, they're early Cretaceous, and represent terrestrial sediments, which might rule in favour of pterosaur. Not that I know that much about the Hastings beds - I'm sure you'll understand when I say I tend to focus on the stuff I actually visit. 
Finally found bone[biggrin]
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Rolo

Possibly pterosaur,wealden pterosaur teeth of this type tend to have long roots and thin fragile enamel with fine longitudal striations. They are normally assigned simply to Ornithocheirids. Your tooth is somewhat more robust than the pterosaur teeth I have collected,so I'd see what others have to say before being certain.
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Rolo

BTW, sent you a PM BBK.
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sd41
QUOTE ' it can't be Dimorphodon - that's an early JUrassic genus'

Yes, you're quite right deltapodus...I stand corrected!

I was only about 60 Million years out!!!!!!!!! Time to research a bit harder, me thinks.
Fossil hunting...What a rush! :)
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BBK
Thanks again for everyone's help here.

I can't see any striations running down the tooth unfortunately.

I will do what I do with many of my finds.....leave it on the back burner, and sooner or later I will read something which matches with this and hopefully leads to a close ID.

Many thanks
Henry
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Robert B.
It may well be a Pterosaur tooth missing it's enamel - worn Moroccan teeth look very similar to yours (I was grading a bunch this morning). These are usually assigned to Sirrocopteryx, although there is sufficient variation to suggest a number of species are present. 
'A man who stares at a rock must have a lot on his mind... or nothing at all'

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