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Miken
Hi again all, thank you for your comments on our previous post. Here are our most recent finds if anybody can help identify?, the stones or bones pictured separately we found very interesting. One we thought maybe a claw, and the other joint bone maybe? Much appreciated, Mike & Family Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0239.jpg, Views: 37, Size: 337.75 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0240.jpg, Views: 35, Size: 126.05 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0243.jpg, Views: 31, Size: 122.41 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0241.jpg, Views: 28, Size: 138.49 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0244.jpg, Views: 27, Size: 103.44 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0242.jpg, Views: 32, Size: 123.89 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0245.jpg, Views: 30, Size: 285.43 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0246.jpg, Views: 31, Size: 229.61 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0247.jpg, Views: 27, Size: 253.57 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0248.jpg, Views: 28, Size: 88.83 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0249.jpg, Views: 28, Size: 98.72 KB Click image for larger version - Name: DSC_0250.jpg, Views: 24, Size: 93.26 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 1563102077608546899435.jpg, Views: 27, Size: 165.34 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 15631021094991721665144.jpg, Views: 28, Size: 151.31 KB Click image for larger version - Name: 1563102132873676235993.jpg, Views: 27, Size: 129.45 KB
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prep01
The first one is I think a broken and worn flint, the second is a flint encasing what looks like a sponge.
Colin Huller
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Barrow Museum

Your last post was a discovery at Filey, and although you don’t mention where these were found, they are typical for material derived from the glacial “till”, along the Yorkshire coast as well.  Till (used to be called Boulder Clay) is the residue left by melting ice at the end of the ice age.  A lot of the material is locally-derived, particularly the Jurassic fossils.  More exotic rocks, volcanics and minerals, are often from much farther afield and have been transported a long way.  The listing below is my best guess for the 18 items.

 

1:  An abundance of indeterminate fossil shells.  Can't offer any more insights without seeing more.

2:  fragments of Lower Jurassic (Toarcian Stage) ammonites – probably Dactylioceras from the Whitby Mudstone Formation (Upper Lias).

3: Gryphaea arcuata, a Lower Jurassic Oyster

4: looks like a worn bivalve internal mould; can’t really say more from the photo.

5: Too indistinct in photo

6: a rather broken and worn sideritic septarian concretion.  Probably fairly local

7: A small concretion.

8: a) ?   b) Gastropod, internal mould.  Not diagnostic enough to guess an age

9: Belemnites, from the Lower Jurassic, probably originally Toarcian, Whitby Mudstone Formation

10:  Can’t tell from the photo

11:  Mineral veins in an exotic pebble.  Origin ? but not local

12 & 14, possibly 15:  Pebbles of volcanic lava, transported to the Yorkshire coast by glacier during the ice-age.  This is a rhomb porphyry and was originally from the Oslo region in Norway

13:  Can’t tell from the photo

16:  Looks like a fragment of a mineral vein, which has grown with a fibrous crystal habit.

17:  Looks like pebble of volcanic rock.  May be Oslo again, but I can’t be sure

18:  Lower Jurassic bivalves, of the genus Cardinia.

 The separate objects – The first - I’m not too sure from the pictures, but probably a fragment of fibrous mineral vein (similar to 16).  The second looks like a concretion which formed around whatever those cavities were. The grey colour means it could be Northern Province flint, (Flint in southern England is black by comparison) but I can't tell as it looks rather too granular in the photo.  If the white material adhering to it is chalk, then it is flint.

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